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RE: [CSS-TECHS]

From: Jo Miller <jo@bendingline.com>
Date: Wed, 18 Jul 2001 13:11:26 -0400
Message-Id: <p05100319b77b66af1b46@[192.168.1.101]>
To: w3c-wai-gl@w3.org
I agree: the reminder that separating structure from presentation 
helps make sites ready for the new generation of emerging and 
still-to-come technologies (cell phones, talking car browsers, etc.) 
often gets web authors' attention, and sometimes helps them make the 
cost-benefit argument to their bosses. So this aspect of 
device-independence is perhaps worth mentioning in the techniques, 
even if it's just an aside.

By the way, did anyone hear Douglas Rushkoff's commentary on National 
Public Radio last week about people seeking out WAP sites with their 
graphical browsers, because the no-frills WAP versions are easier and 
pleasanter to use? Interesting.
http://search.npr.org/cf/cmn/cmnpd01fm.cfm?PrgDate=7%2F9%2F2001&PrgID=2

Jo

At 9:49 -0600 7/18/01, Joel Sanda wrote:
>I have a suggestion for 'convincing web developers' to use CSS in general
>and these techniques in particular.
>
>Accessibility alwas seems to be equated with disability - but of the three
>disabilities web developers can code "for" or "around" there are currently
>very popular and relatively inexpensive technological solutions that
>correspond to disabilities we can code around: vision, mobility, and
>hearing.
>
>VISION: We can equate vision with the video card and images. Internet
>capable cell phones don't have a very robust video card and can't really do
>images that well. A case in point for using text-based solutions and then
>augmenting that information with images.
>
>MOBILITY: Coding for input-device independence opens the door again for
>Internet use with cell phones and accounts for PDAs, which have a stylus.
>MouseEvents in general are useless with the devices.
>
>HEARING: Again, PDAs and Cell Phones. Augment with sound as with images, and
>devices will either render the sound content or not.
>
>I've found that by introducing accessibility as an issue of user agent and
>not user, developers are much more enthusiastic when it comes to
>implementing the WCAG.
>
>Joel
>
>
>Joel Sanda
>Product Manager
>-------------------------------------------------------www.eCollege.com
>eCollege
>joels@ecollege.com
>>  p. 303.873.7400 x3021
>  > f.  303.632.1721
--
Jo Miller
jo@bendingline.com
Received on Wednesday, 18 July 2001 13:12:14 GMT

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