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Re: Colorblindness references

From: Lisa Seeman <seeman@netvision.net.il>
Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2001 10:29:56 +0200
Message-ID: <009401c08a96$d41be7e0$a492003e@seeman>
Cc: <w3c-wai-gl@w3.org>
I am fine with any of these type of solutions, so long as we do not just
drop recommending the use of accessible color schemes altogether.
-----Original Message-----
From: Charles McCathieNevile <charles@w3.org>
To: Dick Brown <dickb@microsoft.com>
Cc: w3c-wai-gl@w3.org <w3c-wai-gl@w3.org>
Date: Tuesday, January 30, 2001 10:04 AM
Subject: Re: Colorblindness references


>I agree with Dick that recommending color schemes in a checkpoint is a bad
>idea. But I think it might be helpful if there are techniques that can
>provide a few choices of three, four or five different colors that are
>generally OK used together, or an algorithm for determining this. (There is
>actually a tool out there that will do a color-blindness simulation, but
that
>doesn't help if you are colour-blind).
>
>Charles McCN
>
>On Fri, 26 Jan 2001, Dick Brown wrote:
>
>  Resending, as it doesn't appear this went through Thursday.
>
>  Dick Brown
>
>  -----Original Message-----
>  From: Dick Brown
>  Sent: Thu 1/25/2001 2:49 PM
>  To: 'w3c-wai-gl@w3.org'
>  Cc:
>  Subject: Colorblindness references
>
>
>
>  I took an action item to send some pointers to resources on
colorblindness.
>
>  Some of the resources below do in fact indicate what kind of combinations
>  can often cause problems, and I think it would be appropriate for us to
>  include those in techniques. I do not think we should *recommend* color
>  schemes, especially in a checkpoint.
>
>  Dick Brown, Microsoft
>
>
>   <http://msdn.microsoft.com/voices/hess10092000.asp> Can Color-Blind
Users
>  See Your Site?   <http://msdn.microsoft.com/voices/hess10092000.asp>
>  http://msdn.microsoft.com/voices/hess10092000.asp
>  Columnist Robert Hess continues his series on color use. This time, he
>  examines how color choices can affect site accessibility. (October 9,
2000)
>
>  A site to simulate rendering for people with color vision problems:
>
>   <http://www.vischeck.com/vischeckURL.php3>
>  http://www.vischeck.com/vischeckURL.php3
>
>   <http://www.lighthouse.org/color_contrast.htm>
>  http://www.lighthouse.org/color_contrast.htm.
>
>
>  >From the Microsoft Windows Guidelines for Accessible Software Design at
>
>   <http://www.microsoft.com/enable/dev/guidelines/software.htm>
>  http://www.microsoft.com/enable/dev/guidelines/software.htm:
>
>  Avoid Problematic Color Combinations
>
>  Summary: Avoid using colors that commonly cause problems for people with
>  color vision anomalies.
>
>  There are a number of things that can be done to allow even individuals
with
>  color vision anomalies to be able to take advantage of the color-coded
>  information:
>
>  -- Avoid using common pairs of colors that are indistinguishable by
people
>  with color perception anomalies. For example, avoid mixing green and
blue,
>  or red and green, red and brown, or white and light green.
>
>  -- Use colors that differ significantly in hues and intensity
>
>  -- Avoid muted colors with low luminance values (intensity).
>
>
>
>
>   <mailto:1854874@skytel.com>
>
>
>
>--
>Charles McCathieNevile    http://www.w3.org/People/Charles  phone: +61 409
134 136
>W3C Web Accessibility Initiative     http://www.w3.org/WAI    fax: +1 617
258 5999
>Location: I-cubed, 110 Victoria Street, Carlton VIC 3053, Australia
>(or W3C INRIA, Route des Lucioles, BP 93, 06902 Sophia Antipolis Cedex,
France)
>
>
Received on Tuesday, 30 January 2001 03:29:28 GMT

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