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Re: Comments on PAGEAUTH 2.4: Lists

From: Ian Jacobs <ij@w3.org>
Date: Sun, 07 Mar 1999 09:11:59 -0500
Message-ID: <36E2892F.7D780BFD@w3.org>
To: Gerald Oskoboiny <gerald@w3.org>
CC: w3c-wai-gl@w3.org
Gerald Oskoboiny wrote:

Hi Gerald,

Thanks for the comment! Note for the record that
the Techniques document is not in last call, only
the guidelines document [1] is. However, all comments
you have on either are very welcome.

 - Ian

[1] http://www.w3.org/TR/1999/WD-WAI-PAGEAUTH-19990226/

> Hi,
> 
> I'm hoping to do a thorough review of this document later this
> week (I've had it on my todo list since last June, and now that
> the document is in Last Call I guess it's now or never.)
> 
> For now, I just have a quick comment on section 2.4, "Lists":
> 
>     http://www.w3.org/TR/1999/WD-WAI-PAGEAUTH-19990226/wai-pageauth-tech#lists
> 
>     [Checkpoint 5.2] Encode list structure and list items properly.
>     [Priority 2] The HTML list elements DL, UL, and OL (available in
>     HTML 3.2 and HTML 4.0) should only be used to create lists, not
>     for formatting effects such as indentation.
> 
>     When possible, use ordered (numbered) lists to help navigation.
> 
> and the example it gives is:
> 
>     Example.
> 
>     Instead of nesting bulleted lists like this:
> 
>       * writing tools
>            + pens
>                 o highlighters
>                      # red
>                      # green
>                      # blue
>                 o ball-point
>                      # green
>                      # purple
>                      # mauve
>            + pencils
>                 o soft lead
>                 o #2 lead
>       * erasers
> 
> [...]
> 
>     Use ordered lists (or make sure to put distinguishing
>     information at the beginning of each list item):
> 
>      1. writing tools
>           1. pens
>                1. highlighters
>                     1. red
>                     2. green
>                     3. blue
>                2. ball-point
>                     1. green
>                     2. purple
>                     3. mauve
>           1. pencils
>                1. soft lead
>                2. #2 lead
>      2. erasers
> 
> But this doesn't seem like a good example of an ordered list at
> all -- the items in these lists don't have a particular order to
> them (green, purple, and mauve aren't in that order for any
> particular reason.)
> 
> I suggest that this example be changed to use list items that
> really ought to be ordered. (like giving instructions on how
> to do something.)

Yep, I agree.

> --
> Gerald Oskoboiny       <gerald@w3.org>  +1 617 253 2920
> System Administrator   http://www.w3.org/People/Gerald/
> World Wide Web Consortium (W3C)      http://www.w3.org/

-- 
Ian Jacobs (jacobs@w3.org) 
Tel/Fax: (212) 684-1814 
http://www.w3.org/People/Jacobs
Received on Sunday, 7 March 1999 09:11:08 GMT

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