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Page Authoring Comments

From: Robert C. Neff <rcn@fenix2.dol-esa.gov>
Date: Tue, 12 Jan 1999 16:58:54 -0500
Message-ID: <01BE3E4C.D6BE87C0.rcn@fenix2.dol-esa.gov>
To: "'w3c-wai-gl@w3.org'" <w3c-wai-gl@w3.org>
1.  Seems  A.8 should be more clear on when to use tables and when not to 
use them.  This needs to ensure it mirrors the QuickTips or vica versa.

I would support a statement where to ask not to use tables for formating 
text, and layout.  For example, navigation bars are not good if they are 
used in a table.

2.  Just before A.1 is a paragraph labeled 2.

This discusses cross platform.  Shouldnt this be cross browser?  Cross 
platform means across different operating systems.

3.  I can see people eventually using HTML 4, but i think we still should 
be approaching HTML 3.2 design as an interim methodology.  Maybe this can 
be weaved into the forward?   Why?  Please read...

Many webmasters for the government must design for the lowest common 
denominator on the internet and intranet. That is, you cant always count on 
the intranet/internet  to be one browser and version.  Therefore I think we 
should include information that states how to design and redesign your 
current site is important - maybe another forum would be good for this. 
 Show them how to check and then fix their sight - offer a solution until 
the  point where everyone migrates to HTML 4 on that world upgrade day :)

You need to remember the dark ages where people still have 386s, 486s and 
pentiums with little or no RAM/Disk space.  There are two barriers to one 
enterprise upgrade of an HTML 4 browser:

a.  They are memory hogs and not all PCs can support them. If you surveyed 
the Information Technology  office in each government agency, they could 
not all tell you what they have (PCs and browsers).

b.  Security is an issue and needs to be review before implemented.  Even 
though they have administration kits where technology can be mastered and 
toggled on and off by some people.

Managers are afraid of what the user will do with the new features if they 
have access to them - what security holes will they open?  What changes 
will users make that are contrary to the Information Technology Policy.

The Information Technology types that control policy and implementation 
need to be educated.  That is, tell them how to do it.  How about someone 
writing a position paper for Microsoft and Netscape  Where they tell them 
how to ensure Universal Accessibility and how their system can be used to 
implement it.

my apologies for just now chiming into provide comments and some late 
remarks.

Robert Neff
Received on Tuesday, 12 January 1999 17:00:39 GMT

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