W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > w3c-wai-er-ig@w3.org > February 2001

Re: Larger EARL report: issues arise

From: Leonard R. Kasday <kasday@acm.org>
Date: Sat, 03 Feb 2001 23:08:11 -0500
Message-Id: <4.3.2.7.2.20010203223730.00d39630@pop3.concentric.net>
To: w3c-wai-er-ig@w3.org
Sean,

Thanks for the tips on shortening the notation.

As for use of the curley brackets signifying context, where I had the 
humans :hu1 and :hu2 asserting different things about e:altStatus   (BTW, I 
correct a typo here... I had aerte:altStatus)
:hu1 e:says {:img1 e:altStatus e:fail } .
:hu2 e:says {:img1 e:altStatus e:pass } .

I rechecked and i think that indeed a proper use of context.  [1] says:

QUOTE
Sometimes, we need to talk about more than one context. For example, if 
either one statement or another is true, then we can't put them in the same 
context.
In N3 a context can be represented by enclosing all the statements it 
encloses in curly braces { }....

<x.rdf> :says {  :pat a :Person . } .

... This example just declares that the document x.rdf expresses the 
hypothetical context in which it is stated that pat is a person: the 
statement above doesn't state that pat is a person.
END QUOTE

That's what I'm trying to express... two contexts: in one context, the one 
:hu1 expresses, in which e:altStatus is fail, in the other, which :hu2 
expresses, in which it's pass.  And I'd want this even if we had just one 
human saying one thing.  It's a statement about another statement.

Ref [1] also has the following example for square brackets:

QUOTE
<#pat> <#child> [ <#age> "4" ] , [ <age> "3" ].
You could read this as #pat has a #child which has #age of "4" and a #child 
which has an #age of "3".
END QUOTE

note that the square brackets only have predicates and objects, no 
subjects.  So again, I think this shows that the curley bracket contexts 
are what's needed here.

So in addition to getting a good vocabulary, we've got to thing about what 
the terms have as objects.  Objects can be elements in a site, the site as 
a whole, or contexts containing statements about a site.

Len

Len

[1] http://www.w3.org/2000/10/swap/Primer.html
--
Leonard R. Kasday, Ph.D.
Institute on Disabilities/UAP and Dept. of Electrical Engineering at Temple 
University
(215) 204-2247 (voice)                 (800) 750-7428 (TTY)
http://astro.temple.edu/~kasday         mailto:kasday@acm.org

Chair, W3C Web Accessibility Initiative Evaluation and Repair Tools Group
http://www.w3.org/WAI/ER/IG/

The WAVE web page accessibility evaluation assistant: 
http://www.temple.edu/inst_disabilities/piat/wave/
Received on Saturday, 3 February 2001 23:08:08 GMT

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