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Re: Technique 14.1 - Use the clearest and simplest language appropriate for a site's content

From: Wendy A Chisholm <wendy@w3.org>
Date: Mon, 26 Jun 2000 10:03:07 -0400
Message-Id: <4.2.0.58.20000626095954.02525750@localhost>
To: "Chris Ridpath" <chris.ridpath@utoronto.ca>
Cc: "WAI ER IG List" <w3c-wai-er-ig@w3.org>
These are phrased as WCAG checkpoints (or techniques) rather than AERT 
techniques.  To maintain consistency with AERT, they should read:
14.1.4 - Check for slang and jargon  or Verify that slang and jargon is used
14.1.8 - Check for specialized meanings of familiar words

This info needs to be incorporated back into WCAG Techniques.  I will pass 
it along to that group.
--wendy

At 09:13 AM 6/15/00 , Chris Ridpath wrote:
>I'll modify these to read:
>
>14.1.4 - Avoid slang and jargon.
>evaluation: any text within the document
>Check all words in the document against a dictionary of slang and jargon
>words that are in the document's primary language. If any slang or jargon
>words are found then inform the user and allow them to change the words.
>
>14.1.8 - Avoid specialized meanings of familiar words
>evaluation: any text within the document
>This is a manual check. User will have to check the entire document.
>
>14.1.5 - Favor words that are commonly used
>evaluation: any text within the document
>Check all words in the document against a dictionary of uncommonly used
>words that are in the document's primary language. If any uncommon words are
>found then inform the user and allow them to change the words.
>
>14.1.6 - Use active rather than passive verbs.
>evaluation: any text within the document
>For a document with a primary language of English, check for form of the
>verb to be (is, am, be, being, were, was, been). If the sentence contains
>any of these words then suggest to the author that they should check the
>sentence for passive verbs.
>(Another indicator is 'by'.)
>
>Can anyone refine the algorithm in 14.1.6 (passive verbs) to make it more
>accurate?
>What about other languages for 14.1.6?
>
>Chris
>
>
>----- Original Message -----
>From: "Charles McCathieNevile" <charles@w3.org>
>To: "Chris Ridpath" <chris.ridpath@utoronto.ca>
>Cc: "WAI ER IG List" <w3c-wai-er-ig@w3.org>
>Sent: Thursday, June 15, 2000 1:23 AM
>Subject: Re: Technique 14.1 - Use the clearest and simplest language
>appropriate for a site's content
>
>
> > These can mostly be automated by using dictionary lookups. (The exception
>is
> > specialised meanings for normal words) And yes, it is possible to get a
> > reasonably accurate test for whether a verb is used actively or passivley
>in
> > many languages. An examle algorithm for english is to look for a past
> > participle with a part of the verb to be. (That is oversimplified, but
>works
> > for the examples in this message...)
> >
> > cheers
> >
> > Charles
> >
> > On Wed, 14 Jun 2000, Chris Ridpath wrote:
> >
> >   Starting suggestions:
> > [snip]
> >   14.1.4 - Avoid slang, jargon, and specialized meanings of familiar words
> >   evaluation: any text within the document
> >   This is a manual check. User will have to check the entire document.
> >
> >   14.1.5 - Favor words that are commonly used
> >   evaluation: any text within the document
> >   This is a manual check. User will have to check the entire document.
> >
> >   14.1.6 - Use active rather than passive verbs.
> >   evaluation: any text within the document
> >   This is a manual check. User will have to check the entire document. (Is
> >   there a way to accurately detect active vs. passive verbs?)
> >
> >

--
wendy a chisholm
world wide web consortium
web accessibility initiative
madison, wi usa
tel: +1 608 663 6346
/--
Received on Monday, 26 June 2000 10:04:37 GMT

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