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How People with Disabilities Use the Web: Diversity page

From: Alan Chuter <achuter1@gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2011 21:10:01 +0200
Message-ID: <BANLkTimQ9og=2u6GF_7bmeoRpGwQRMwhDQ@mail.gmail.com>
To: wai-eo-editors@w3.org, EOWG <w3c-wai-eo@w3.org>
Some last-minute comments on this page [1] that I have just read. My
apologies if these items have already been discussed.

In the "Content formats" section I initially was confused by the term
"formats" as it suggests a document format, such as HTML or ODF. The
title continues with "hearing, feeling, and seeing" which doesn't
clarify matters. I can't think of a more precise word, but perhaps
"different forms" or "different ways", or in the title append "for" as
in "Content formats - for hearing, feeling, and seeing".

The phrase "some people *are* not seeing the screen" sounds odd to me;
it would be better to say "some people are not able to see the
screen".

In the third paragraph of "More about content formats", the phrase
"need to be created with at least some level of human intervention"
does not relate properly to the opening "In some cases, content can be
converted into different formats using software or hardware". I think
that the opening phrase should be qualified as "... converted into
different formats by the user's own software or hardware".

In the last sentence of the third paragraph "Sometimes software tools,
such as voice and image recognition, can assist authors in providing
such formats but the conversion is usually not fully automatable"
should be qualified with the phrase "emerging technologies" to avoid
giving the reader false expectations. Or maybe I'm out of touch with
recent developments.

regards,

Alan

[1] http://www.w3.org/WAI/EO/Drafts/PWD-Use-Web/2009/browsing

-- 
Alan Chuter
achuter1@gmail.com
Received on Wednesday, 27 April 2011 19:12:59 GMT

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