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added aging above the fold in "Introduction to Web Accessibility"

From: Shawn Henry <shawn@w3.org>
Date: Fri, 12 Aug 2005 22:28:01 -0500
Message-ID: <42FD68C1.1020206@w3.org>
To: "EOWG (E-mail)" <w3c-wai-eo@w3.org>

EOWG,

Following the EOWG discussion today on incorporating aging in our resources[1], I made the addition below. Please reply to the list if you have any concerns or other recommendations. 

* location: "Introduction to Web Accessibility"
	http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/accessibility.php

* previous wording of first 2 paragraphs:
Web accessibility means that people with disabilities can use the Web. More specifically, Web accessibility means that people with disabilities can perceive, understand, navigate, and interact with the Web, and that they can contribute to the Web.
Web accessibility encompasses all disabilities that affect access to the Web, including visual, auditory, physical, speech, cognitive, and neurological disabilities. The document "How People with Disabilities Use the Web" describes how different disabilities affect Web use and includes scenarios of people with disabilities using the Web.

* revision: added sentence to end of first paragraph:
"Web accessibility also benefits others, including older people with changing abilities due to aging." 
and linked it to business case social factors page section:
Web accessibility means that people with disabilities can use the Web. More specifically, Web accessibility means that people with disabilities can perceive, understand, navigate, and interact with the Web, and that they can contribute to the Web. Web accessibility also benefits others, including <a href="/WAI/EO/Drafts/bcase/soc.html#of">older people</a> with changing abilities due to aging.

* rationale: getting aging "above the fold" 

* slight concern: does that dilute the first paragraph's focus on a definition of Web accessibility? counter: we had wanted to put something about benefits early in the document, and the next couple of paragraphs are very heavy on disability info.

Notes:

* I ruled out the idea of making the first definition paragraph much more general to cover "everybody" since Web accessibility does focus on people with disabilities, and EOWG has agreed previously that it is important not to dilute that focus on disability.

* I tried adding it to the second paragraph, but it didn't seem to fit well, and got lost in all the disability info.

* I left the mention lower in the page: "This flexibility also benefits people without disabilities in certain situations, such as ... people with changing abilities due to aging."

* Perhaps if/when we have a piece specifically about aging/old people, we could link to that (rather than the business case social factors section)

Regards,
~ Shawn

[1] http://www.w3.org/2005/08/12-eo-minutes.html#item03
Received on Saturday, 13 August 2005 03:28:10 GMT

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