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[selecting eval tools] simplifying terminology and wording at beginning

From: Shawn Henry <shawn@w3.org>
Date: Fri, 17 Dec 2004 10:08:58 -0600
Message-ID: <41C3049A.9020209@w3.org>
To: "EOWG (E-mail)" <w3c-wai-eo@w3.org>
Cc: shadi@w3.org

Shadi & EOWG,

Below is a first pass at simplifying the beginning of the document.

I feel pretty strongly that we should use only "evaluation tools" for the high-level term (e.g., in the title) - and then only where necessary use the specific "types" of tools.

Best,

~ Shawn
========

<h1>Selecting Web Accessibility Evaluation Tools

<h2>Introduction

Web accessibility evaluation tools are software programs that help determine if a Web site is accessible, and help improve Web accessibility. This document explains different features of evaluation tools and helps to determine which types of tools and features would best meet your specific needs.

WAI encourages the development and evolution of Web accessibility evaluation tools, and maintains an <a>extensive list of evaluation tools</a>. WAI does not endorse or promote any specific tool or vendor.

<h2>Features of Web Accessibility Evaluation Tools

Web accessibility evaluation tools provide one or more of the following features:

- Checks whether Web pages meet specific guidelines or standards, such as the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0. For example, the tool lists which guidelines the Web pages does and does not meet. [short example of results] These tools can be called "<strong>conformance tools</>." 

- Changes the appearance or presentation of Web pages, which can help identify potential accessibility problems. For example, the tool might read the Web page aloud (screen reader), or add HTML markup to the visual presentation of the page. [screen grab that matches written example] These tools are called "<strong>transformation tools</>." 

- Helps fix accessibility problems in Web pages. For example, the tool might provide a dialog box for entering missing alternative (ALT) text descriptions for images. [screen grab that matches written example] These tools are called "<strong>repair tools</>." 

- Checks whether Web pages meet Web specifications, such as HTML, XHTML, or CSS. These are called "<strong>validation tools</a>," and they evaluate more than specific accessibility issues.

Web accessibility evaluation tools are usually stand-alone software, and sometimes are "plug-ins" for Web browsers or Web authoring tools (such as Web page editors, content management systems, or word processors). Some tools run periodically to monitor Web site accessibility. [wonder if this paragraph fits here or elsewhere?]
Received on Friday, 17 December 2004 16:08:45 GMT

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