W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > w3c-wai-eo@w3.org > April to June 2003

Re: EDITS: "Reduce Site Maintenance"

From: Alan Chuter <achuter@teleservicios.com>
Date: Thu, 22 May 2003 11:31:31 +0200
To: w3c-wai-eo@w3.org
Message-ID: <oprpkh2tw9so27mf@mail.teleservicios.com>

Here are some more ideas:

Replace "manpower" and "time" with "effort"

The point on validation could mention that validated code is less likely to 
need to be tweaked/rewritten for new browsers and versions. It can also be 
transformed and corrected.

In the last point, perhaps "The latest versions" isn't necessary, as 
keeping up with the lates version implies increased maintenance.

In the update and redesign point, we could delete "existing" or replace it 
wiht "standardised".

I'm not clear about how built-in accessibility features reduce site 
maintenance, perhaps this should explained.

"Repackaging" might be better expressed as "repurposing" or "reuse".

In the last sentence, I think "access modes" or "multimodal access" and 
"devices" are the words to use.

regards to all,

Alan Chuter
achuter@teleservicios.es
+34 91 121 03 35


On Wed, 21 May 2003 14:59:28 -0400, Chuck Letourneau <cpl@starlingweb.com> 
wrote:

> Hi Charmane,
>
> I like the approach you have taken to this section.  Without (I hope) 
> changing your style I offer the following slight rewordings for 
> discussion:
>
> In the second sentence of the introductory paragraph, I would add the 
> word "savings" (but perhaps it is redundant in this context):
> "This efficiency may be reflected in manpower and direct cost savings to 
> the organization. "
>
> Bullet 1:
>
> *  Update and redesign time may be reduced by using an appropriate 
> existing markup language to style and format text, formulae and images 
> instead of using difficult to modify bitmaps. (Checkpoint 3.1)
>
> Perhaps the above change is a bit too jargony, but I think it comes 
> closer to the original intent of  Checkpoint 3.1.  (In spite of the fact 
> that there are people out there who think fiddling with bitmaps is much 
> simpler than debugging CSS.)
>
> Bullet 2:
>
> *  Writing documents that follow a published formal grammar and 
> identifying it by including a DOCTYPE statement will facilitate efficient 
> debugging with automated validation tools. (Checkpoint 3.2)
>
> This slight rewording makes the statement clearer (to me, at least).
>
> Bullet 3: looks fine to me.
>
> Bullet 4:
>
> You (and Henk?) ask whether "mobile" should modify "devices" in the last 
> bullet. I don't think so, because they might not be mobile.
>
> You ask if "repackaged" should be "repurposed".  I have eight English 
> language dictionaries in my house but not one of them contains 
> "repurposed".  Granted, they're more than 8 years old.  Is "repurposed" a 
> word anywhere other than in W3C circles?  Isn't "repackaged" easier to 
> translate? (And, yes, I'm being hypocritical because I do use 
> "repurposed" all the time... jargon is seductive.)
>
> I also agree with you that adding that list of W3C technologies is useful 
> here.
>
> *  The latest versions of W3C technologies (such as MathML, XHTML, XML, 
> RDF, SMIL, CSS, XSL, XSLT, and PNG) have accessibility features built in. 
> Using them facilitates web content repackaging to suit different 
> displays, browsers, and devices without the need to create additional 
> reformatted pages. (Checkpoint 11.1)
>
> Regards,
> Chuck Letourneau
>
> Starling Access Services
> "Access A World Of Possibility"
>
> At 2003-05-20 13:30, Charmane K. Corcoran wrote:
>> Greetings,
>>
>> Suggested rework of "Reduce Site Maintenance" from "Technical Factors 
>> for Consideration in a Business Case for Web Accessibility" at 
>> <http://www.w3.org/WAI/EO/Drafts/bcase/tech.html>http://www.w3.org/WAI/EO/Drafts/bcase/tech.html 
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> I specified the technologies in the last bullet because most people 
>> won't have a clue what technologies you are talking about.  At least 
>> this way they have a starting point and search out info on the 
>> technologies easily.
>>
>> "The latest versions of W3C technologies ....have accessibility features 
>> built in" came from <http://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG10-CORE-TECHS/#access- 
>> reviewed>http://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG10-CORE-TECHS/#access-reviewed Is this 
>> accurate?
>>
>> Like Henk, I wonder about including the word "mobile" with devices.  I 
>> am also wondering about using "repurposed" instead of "repackaged" in 
>> the last bullet item.
>> _____________________
>>
>> Reduce Site Maintenance
>> Implementing relevant WCAG design techniques may reduce time spent on 
>> site development and maintenance. This efficiency may be reflected in 
>> manpower and direct cost to the organization.
>>
>> *  Update and redesign time may be reduced by using style sheets, 
>> appropriate existing markup language, or text in place of images. 
>> (Checkpoint 3.1)
>>
>> *  Writing documents and identifying the published formal grammar by 
>> including a DOCTYPE statement will facilitate efficient debugging with 
>> automated validation tools. (Checkpoint 3.2)
>>
>> *  Controlling layout and presentation through a style sheet allows 
>> changes to affect the entire website at once rather than repeating the 
>> identical change in separate files. (Checkpoint 3.3)
>>
>> *  The latest versions of W3C technologies (such as MathML, XHTML, XML, 
>> RDF, SMIL, CSS, XSL, XSLT, and PNG) have accessibility features built 
>> in.  Using them facilitates web content repackaging to suit different 
>> displays, browsers, and devices without the need to create additional 
>> reformatted pages. (Checkpoint 11.1)
>>
>>
>> Charmane K. Corcoran
>> Information & Project Principal
>> Michigan State University
>



-- 
Received on Thursday, 22 May 2003 05:30:49 GMT

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.2.0+W3C-0.50 : Friday, 27 April 2012 10:33:36 GMT