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Re: edit of profiles draft

From: Judy Brewer <jbrewer@w3.org>
Date: Fri, 15 Oct 1999 02:08:09 -0400
Message-Id: <3.0.5.32.19991015020809.00ad4620@localhost>
To: allan_jm@tsb1.tsbvi.edu, WAI-EO <w3c-wai-eo@w3.org>
Thanks for the comments Jim!

Regards,

- Judy

At 11:58 AM 10/11/99 -0500, Jim Allan wrote:
>Have been out of pocket for last 2 weeks due to work and illness. Latest
>draft of "How People with Disabilities Use the Web" shows much hard work.
>Below are suggestions for Section 2 (not yet revised). Following the
>suggestions is a rewrite incorporating the suggestions.
>
>Braille and refreshable braille
>Braille is a technique involving six [[replace-"to" with "or"]] eight dots
>that are raised in different patterns to represent letters and numbers so
>that they may be read by people who are blind using their fingertips.
>Braille systems vary greatly around the world. Some "grades" of braille
>include additional codes beyond standard alpha-numeric characters, to
>represent common letter groupings (e.g., "th," "ble" in Grade II American
>English braille) to make braille more compact. An 8-dot version of braille
>has been developed to allow all ASCII characters to be represented. Dynamic
>or refreshable braille involves the use of a mechanical display where dots
>can be raised and lowered dynamically to allow any braille [[replace "words"
>with "symbols"]] to be displayed. Only letters and numbers can be
>represented in braille, although some braille printers have [[replace "a
>utility that allows simple graphics to be drawn on a sheet" with "the
>ability to emboss simple graphics"]]  using the raised dots at a resolution
>of approximately 11 dots per inch.
>Screen magnifiers
>Software used primarily by individuals with low vision that magnifies a
>portion of the screen for easier viewing. Note that at the same time screen
>magnifiers make presentations larger, they also reduce the area of the
>document that may be viewed [[insert-""on the monitor"]]. Some screen
>magnifiers therefore offer two views of the screen: one magnified and one
>default size for navigation.
>Screen readers:
>Software used by individuals who are blind or have learning disabilities
>that interprets what is displayed on a screen, and directs it either to
>[[replace "speech synthesis" with "a speech synthesizer"]], for audio
>output, or [[replace "refreshable braille" with "a refreshable braille
>display"]], for tactile output. Some screen readers use the document tree
>(i.e., the parsed document) as their input. However, older screen readers
>make use of the rendered version of a document, meaning that document order
>or structure may be lost (e.g., when tables are used for layout) and their
>output may be confusing.
>
>=== Rewrite
>
>Braille and refreshable braille
>Braille is a technique involving six or eight dots that are raised in
>different patterns to represent letters and numbers so that they may be read
>by people who are blind using their fingertips. Braille systems vary greatly
>around the world. Some "grades" of braille include additional codes beyond
>standard alpha-numeric characters, to represent common letter groupings
>(e.g., "th," "ble" in Grade II American English braille) to make braille
>more compact. An 8-dot version of braille has been developed to allow all
>ASCII characters to be represented. Dynamic or refreshable braille involves
>the use of a mechanical display where dots can be raised and lowered
>dynamically to allow any braille symbols to be displayed. Only letters and
>numbers can be represented in braille, although some braille printers have
>the ability to emboss simple graphics  using the raised dots at a resolution
>of approximately 11 dots per inch.
>Screen magnifiers
>Software used primarily by individuals with low vision that magnifies a
>portion of the screen for easier viewing. Note that at the same time screen
>magnifiers make presentations larger, they also reduce the area of the
>document that may be viewed on the monitor. Some screen magnifiers therefore
>offer two views of the screen: one magnified and one default size for
>navigation.
>Screen readers:
>Software used by individuals who are blind or have learning disabilities
>that interprets what is displayed on a screen, and directs it either to a
>speech synthesizer, for audio output, or a refreshable braille display, for
>tactile output. Some screen readers use the document tree (i.e., the parsed
>document) as their input. However, older screen readers make use of the
>rendered version of a document, meaning that document order or structure may
>be lost (e.g., when tables are used for layout) and their output may be
>confusing.
>
>
>Jim Allan, Statewide Technical Support Specialist
>Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired
>1100 W. 45th St., Austin, Texas 78756
>voice 512.206.9315    fax: 512.206.9453  http://www.tsbvi.edu/
>"We shape our tools and thereafter our tools shape us." McLuhan, 1964
>
>
>
----------
Judy Brewer    jbrewer@w3.org    +1.617.258.9741    http://www.w3.org/WAI
Director, Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) International Program Office
World Wide Web Consortium (W3C)
MIT/LCS Room NE43-355, 545 Technology Square, Cambridge, MA,  02139,  USA
Received on Friday, 15 October 1999 02:09:34 GMT

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