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Re: 1.4 f: terms for links colocated with their ends



.
>>[Liora Alschuler:]
>>
>>| Is there a reason why we can't just call these "direct" and "indirect"
>>| links?
>>
[Jon Bosak]
>>I agree with Liora.  These work very well intuitively and are about as
>>apropos as anything else that's been suggested.

[Steve DeRose]
>I disagree on this one; Len said it pretty well: direct and indirect are
>more natural terms for a quite different distinction, namely whether
>indirection is used in the location specification. "Indirect addressing" is
>so well-established a term that I can't imagine re-assigning it to another
>use, when we need the equivalent of its standard meaning to.
>
>I'm also with James in disliking 'contextual'; I don't mind 'independent'
>too much; but just 'i' and 'c' doesn't do it for me.
>

There seems to be no single, descriptive term that encompasses all the
qualities of each type of link so I suggest names that emphasize none of the
qualities (not, then, in-line or direct or independent). I think that
"simple link" and "complex link" would be good, but if shortened into slink
and clink, while they have a nice sound, would conflict with HyTime. 

Maybe "simple" or "basic" as James suggested coupled with "xlink" for the
sophisticated, complex types of linking now possible with XML. I think it
would be easy to present simple links as what you get now with HTML and XML
links as the future made possible by XML applications.

Liora




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