W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > w3c-sgml-wg@w3.org > November 1996

FPI's in NOTATION declarations

From: Ken Holman <gkholman@microstar.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Nov 1996 17:12:17 -0500
Message-ID: <c=US%a=_%p=Microstar_Softwa%l=OTTA02-961128221217Z-2519@otta02.microstar.com>
To: "'w3c-sgml'" <w3c-sgml-wg@w3.org>
Not necessarily a bad example when FPI's are used in the NOTATION
declaration.

One thing to remember is that the FPI registered owner identifier, when
using the ISBN registered owner prefix, is typically manufactured from
the ISBN Publisher's Prefix only, but can be meaningfully manufactured
with a full ISBN.

A full ISBN can be used in an FPI to refer to a concept by pointing to
an instance of publication of that concept. The NOTATION declaration for
TeX could be:

<!NOTATION TeX PUBLIC "+//ISBN 0-201-13448-9::Knuth//NOTATION The
TeXbook//EN">
or
<!NOTATION TeX PUBLIC "+//ISBN 0-201-13447-0::Knuth//NOTATION The
TeXbook//EN">

There are two possible because the first is the paperback and the second
is the hardcover.

In these cases one is not trying to dereference a location, rather, just
trying to dereference a concept or specification.  I don't think that a
SYSTEM identifier with an URL would suffice for this.

This would require XML production [69] ExternalId, which is used in
production [77] NotationDecl, to support 'PUBLIC' as well as the
currently hardwired 'SYSTEM' value (or, of course, add something new to
NotationDecl so that other references to ExternalId in the specification
are not affected).

............ Ken

--
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Chief Technology Officer Fax:  +1 613 596-5934          \/ \/   Computer
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--
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CANADA  KOA-2E0          E-mail: gkholman@CanadaMail.com

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>----------
>From:
>	bosak@atlantic-83.Eng.Sun.COM[SMTP:bosak@atlantic-83.Eng.Sun.COM]
>Sent: 	Thursday, November 28, 1996 15:11
>To: 	tallen@fsc.fujitsu.com
>Cc: 	w3c-sgml-wg@w3.org
>Subject: 	Re: Simple solution? Pub. Idents. vs URN.
>
>[Terry Allen:]
>
>| ISBNs precisely do identify classes of identical physical objects.
>| The paperback and hardback realizations of the same text (nonphysical
>| object) printed exactly the same way commonly have different ISBNs.
>| Furthermore, sloppy publishers sometimes do not change the ISBN of a
>| book when they issue a revised edition.  ISBNs are about the worst
>| possible illustration of URNs.
>
>You're right, that was a terrible example.  Legal citations might have
>been better.
>
>Jon
>
>
Received on Thursday, 28 November 1996 17:13:50 EST

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