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Re: use/mention and reification

From: Dan Brickley <danbri@w3.org>
Date: Tue, 22 Jan 2002 03:45:00 -0500
To: Patrick Stickler <patrick.stickler@nokia.com>
Cc: Dan Connolly <connolly@w3.org>, Jan Grant <Jan.Grant@bristol.ac.uk>, RDF Core <w3c-rdfcore-wg@w3.org>
Message-ID: <20020122084500.GA18233@tux.w3.org>
* Patrick Stickler <patrick.stickler@nokia.com> [2002-01-22 10:15+0200]
> On 2002-01-21 21:00, "ext Dan Brickley" <danbri@w3.org> wrote:
> 
> > On 21 Jan 2002, Dan Connolly wrote:
> > 
> >> On Mon, 2002-01-21 at 04:06, Jan Grant wrote:
> >>> On 18 Jan 2002, Dan Connolly wrote:
> >> [...]
> >>> I still don't understand why you can't pronounce
> >>> 
> >>> <sentence> <rdf:Subject> <mary> .
> >>> 
> >>> as "the sentence has a subject whose referent is (the person) Mary" -
> >>> ie, if you just change your intuition about what rdf:Subject "means"
> >>> does this go away?
> >> 
> >> Well, yes. That is: it becomes completely useless to me.
> > 
> > For me too. I've used RDF's reification vocab to stuff one RDF graph
> > inside another to carry it thru RDF environments without the inner graph
> > content being asserted alongside the 'outer' graph. So I second DanC's
> > point. 
> 
> I don't see that a reified statement constitutes assertion, per the
> present treatment where subject, predicate, etc. denote the resource
> nodes bearing URI labels rather than URI literals.

to clarify: 
I didn't say that reified statements are asserted; that would be contrary 
to the letter and intent of M&S, not to mention common sense. I said that 
I've been using reification as a mechanism for encoding RDF within RDF in 
a non-asserted form. By 'inner graph' I meant the structure that is 
encoded using rdf:Statement, rdf:predicate, rdf:object and rdf:subject. 

[objections to a position I've never held snipped]

Sorry if my phrasing caused any confusion,

Dan
Received on Tuesday, 22 January 2002 03:45:06 EST

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