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Re: The latest proposal ++--

From: Jan Grant <Jan.Grant@bristol.ac.uk>
Date: Sat, 10 Aug 2002 10:33:06 +0100 (BST)
To: Patrick.Stickler@nokia.com
cc: w3c-rdfcore-wg <w3c-rdfcore-wg@w3.org>
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.4.44.0208101025540.27088-100000@mail.ilrt.bris.ac.uk>

On Fri, 9 Aug 2002 Patrick.Stickler@nokia.com wrote:

> Delete it at will...
>    expected/required datatype of datatyped literal nodes.
>
>    The following closure rule is defined:
>
>    IF
>       ?s ?p "LLL" .
>       ?p rdfs:range ?d .
>       ?d rdf:type rdfs:Datatype .
>    THEN
>       ?s ?p ?d"LLL" .
>
>    This equates the global/implicit and local/explicit datatyping
>    mechanisms.

That's an interesting idea. Like I said, in my experience I was able to
use multiple schemas and still do "syntactic" long-range typing, but I'm
semi-persuaded that global implicit might be useful. You (Pat) say
you've got examples where it is necessary: could you extract the
corporate secrets and present an example of what's left?

I'd go for this, with the proviso that I haven't thought much about it.
Are there monotonicity problems? We certainly seem now to be able to
produce inconsistent graphs (which I don't have a problem with)...

	<s> <p> "LLL" .
	<p> rdfs:range <xsi:integer>
	<p> rdfs:range <xsi:date>

	(plus datatype declarations, although I'm not totally convinced
	they're necessary)

Now, that would appear to be inconsistent. However I was under the
impression that one of the things you wanted from long-range typing was
type intersection, which doesn't appear possible. Are you prepared to do
without it, or is there something I've missed?

Good weekend also folks.

-- 
jan grant, ILRT, University of Bristol. http://www.ilrt.bris.ac.uk/
Tel +44(0)117 9287088 Fax +44 (0)117 9287112 RFC822 jan.grant@bris.ac.uk
perl -e 's?ck?t??print:perl==pants if $_="Just Another Perl Hacker\n"'
Received on Saturday, 10 August 2002 05:35:21 EDT

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