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RE: I-D ACTION:draft-ietf-webdav-quota-01.txt

From: Julian Reschke <julian.reschke@gmx.de>
Date: Tue, 25 Mar 2003 22:00:31 +0100
To: "Clemm, Geoff" <gclemm@rational.com>, "WebDAV" <w3c-dist-auth@w3.org>
Message-ID: <JIEGINCHMLABHJBIGKBCAEONGNAA.julian.reschke@gmx.de>

The reason I raised this is because I feel that a "disk full" indeed is an
error condition on the server (thus 5xx), but a failed request due to
exceeded quota limits happens *on purpose* -- the server theoretically
*could* perform the request, but it doesn't want to.

But as Geoff already stated, this is really not an important issue -- even
more so if we have well-defined condition names that we can send in error
response bodies.

I'd prefer to focus the discussion on the other issues I mentioned (such as
what is the quota model the spec describes, and do we really need to
describe a specific model at all; or: are physical disk limits a special
case of quotas? -- RFC3010 distinguishes both).

Julian

--
<green/>bytes GmbH -- http://www.greenbytes.de -- tel:+492512807760

> -----Original Message-----
> From: w3c-dist-auth-request@w3.org
> [mailto:w3c-dist-auth-request@w3.org]On Behalf Of Clemm, Geoff
> Sent: Tuesday, March 25, 2003 9:51 PM
> To: WebDAV
> Subject: RE: I-D ACTION:draft-ietf-webdav-quota-01.txt
>
>
>
> Any error can be "resolved" by changing the request to something
> else that doesn't fail, so that can't be the criterion used to
> distinguish a 4xx from a 5xx.  All that sections 10.4 and 10.5 say
> are:
>
> "The 4xx class of status code is intended for cases in which the
>  client seems to have erred."
>
> "Response status codes beginning with the digit "5" indicate cases in
>  which the server is aware that it has erred or is incapable of
>  performing the request."
>
> So requests that are malformed are clearly 4xx errors, but
> most other error cases are ambiguous, because looking at the
> error one way, the client erred in asking the server to do something
> it couldn't do (e.g. create a larger file than is permitted), but
> looking at them another way, the server erred by not (or by being
> incapable of) performing the specified request (e.g. create the large
> file).
>
> Cheers,
> Geoff
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Jim Luther [mailto:luther.j@apple.com]
> Sent: Tuesday, March 25, 2003 12:20 PM
> To: WebDAV
> Subject: Re: I-D ACTION:draft-ietf-webdav-quota-01.txt
>
>
>
> I'd refer back to rfc2616's language in sections 10.4 "Client Error
> 4xx" and 10.5 "Server Error 5xx". 4xx is for errors the server thinks
> can be resolved by changes in the client's request, and 5xx is for
> errors the server thinks are caused by something server-side.
>
> - Jim
>
> On Tuesday, March 25, 2003, at 08:35  AM, Clemm, Geoff wrote:
>
> >
> > That wasn't the question I meant to ask.
> >
> > Clearly there are clients that handle a specific code
> > (such as 507) differently from another specific code (such as 413).
> > But in those cases it doesn't matter whether the standard
> > defined that specific code to be in the 4xx or 5xx range.
> >
> > What I was asking was whether there was a client that
> > generically handled 4xx codes (i.e. a 4xx code that it had no
> > special handling for) in a significantly different way than
> > it handles a 5xx code (i.e. a 5xx code that it had no special
> > handling for).  I.e., when we are deciding whether to put a
> > specific code in the 4xx or 5xx range, does it matter which
> > one we pick?
> >
> > Cheers,
> > Geoff
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Jim Luther [mailto:luther.j@apple.com]
> > Sent: Tuesday, March 25, 2003 10:46 AM
> > To: WebDAV
> > Subject: Re: I-D ACTION:draft-ietf-webdav-quota-01.txt
> >
> >
> >
> > On Monday, March 24, 2003, at 07:53  PM, Clemm, Geoff wrote:
> >
> >> Just for interests sake, is there any client that acts significantly
> >> differently if it were to receive a 4xx response instead of a 5xx
> >> response?  If not, this question is merely an aesthetic quibble (:-).
> >
> > Yes there is a client that handles those responses quite differently.
> >
> > The Mac OS X WebDAV file system client translates 507 to ENOSPC (No
> > space left on device) which is interpreted by most Macintosh
> > applications to mean the device is full; the WebDAV file system
> > translates 413 as a generic 4xx response to EINVAL (Invalid argument)
> > which is interpreted by most Macintosh applications to mean "something
> > wasn't right - who knows what?"
> >
> > The Mac OS X WebDAV file system client is one of the few clients
> > actually using quotas today and has been for over 1-1/2 years now.
> >
> > Jim Luther
> > Apple Computer, Inc.
> >
>
Received on Tuesday, 25 March 2003 16:00:41 GMT

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