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RE: Bindings, Locks, and MOVE

From: <jamsden@us.ibm.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Sep 1999 16:21:25 -0400
To: w3c-dist-auth@w3.org
Message-ID: <852567E8.0070009E.00@d54mta03.raleigh.ibm.com>


By best effort, I was refering to section 8.8.3 which states that "... the
server SHOULD try to finish as much of the original copy operation as posible."
In this spirit, failure of the delete and the results in step T4 seem to be
consistent.





"Yaron Goland (Exchange)" <yarong@Exchange.Microsoft.com> on 09/10/99 01:51:46
PM

To:   Jim Amsden/Raleigh/IBM@IBMUS
cc:   w3c-dist-auth@w3.org

Subject:  RE: Bindings, Locks, and MOVE




To quote from section 8.9 of RFC 2518:

   The MOVE operation on a non-collection resource is the logical
   equivalent of a copy (COPY), followed by consistency maintenance
   processing, followed by a delete of the source, where all three
   actions are performed atomically.


MOVE is not a best effort operation. It is an atomic operation which can
conceptually be broken into several steps. However the user is guaranteed
that all the steps occur or none of them occur. An example may help here:

T0 - User sends in a MOVE from server a to server b
T1 - Server a issues a PUT onto server b
T2 - Server a issues a PROPPATCH onto server b
T3 - Network connection between a & b goes down
T4 - User accesses server a and b and finds both servers contain a copy of
the resource!

There are also a lot of implicit state in a resource that a PUT/PROPPATCH
won't necessarily copy over. For example, I would expect the creation date
at the destination to be the same as at the source.

If you use a PUT/PROPPATCH/DELETE to implement MOVE then you are almost
certainly not compliant with WebDAV. In practice this may not matter. I can
imagine any number of systems where this hack may be useful. But it has no
place in a standard.

          Yaron

> -----Original Message-----
> From: jamsden@us.ibm.com [mailto:jamsden@us.ibm.com]
> Sent: Thursday, September 09, 1999 6:26 AM
> To: Yaron Goland (Exchange)
> Cc: w3c-dist-auth@w3.org
> Subject: RE: Bindings, Locks, and MOVE
>
>
>
>
> Yaron,
> I guess I don't see the issue. See comments below.
>
>
>
>
>
> "Yaron Goland (Exchange)" <yarong@Exchange.Microsoft.com> on
> 09/08/99 08:41:47
> PM
>
> To:   Jim Amsden/Raleigh/IBM@IBMUS, w3c-dist-auth@w3.org
> cc:
>
> Subject:  RE: Bindings, Locks, and MOVE
>
>
>
>
> Sigh... every day, in every way, I wish like hell I had never
> written that
> damn "COPY followed by a DELETE" language.
>
> A server CAN NOT implement a cross server MOVE as a WebDAV COPY method
> followed by a WebDAV DELETE method. The reason that this
> isn't possible is
> that the MOVE requires atomic behavior and it requires that
> the resource at
> the destination be the exact same resource (within reason) as
> at the source.
> Therefore, for a cross server MOVE to be possible between two
> unrelated
> servers a new protocol would have to be invented which could
> guarantee the
> WebDAV semantics.
> <jra>
> A WebDAV MOVE is a best effort operation, so it would seem
> that this is
> consistent with non-atomic operation (which might miss
> resources that were added
> or changed after the move began). DAV4J does the MOVE as an
> atomic operation
> whether its from a client of another server acting as a
> client, so it wouldn't
> have this problem anyway. As far as having the destination be
> exactly the same
> as the source, I don't know what "within reason" means. If it
> means has the same
> GUID, or is effectively a new reference to the same resource in some
> server-dependent way, then no, I can't probably do that.
> DAV4J makes a new
> resource at the destination that has the same contents as the
> source, but not
> necessarily the same character encoding, and the same
> properties if possible.
> The only issue is conversion between live and dead properties
> when the servers
> involved support different sets (a potential interoperability
> problem).
>
> It seems this is at least a useful interpretation of the spec.
> </jra>
> In the WebDAV charter you will find the following entry in the list of
> things not in scope for WebDAV:
>
> *HTTP server to server communication protocols
>
> The reason this line was put in the charter was that in the
> beginning a lot
> of folks wanted to enable server to server communication so
> it would be
> possible to do things like cross-server MOVEs. WebDAV decided to focus
> solely on the issue of client/server communication and thus ruled
> server/server communication out of scope. If you wish to do
> cross-server
> MOVEs you will need a new protocol because WebDAV can't do it.
>
>           Yaron
>
> P.S. Stop laughing Jeff! =)
>
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: jamsden@us.ibm.com [mailto:jamsden@us.ibm.com]
> > Sent: Wednesday, September 08, 1999 8:12 AM
> > To: w3c-dist-auth@w3.org
> > Subject: RE: Bindings, Locks, and MOVE
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > The WebDAV spec says that locks are lost on MOVE. So if the
> > source resource is
> > locked, then the MOVE request must include the lock token,
> > and the lock must be
> > owned by the requesting principal. Otherwise the delete
> > portion of the move will
> > fail. Since MOVE is a best effort method, the copy to the
> > destination will work,
> > even if the source can't be deleted. As is the case with
> > COPY, the lock on the
> > destination resource is determined by its new parent
> > collection, not by any lock
> > state it may have had. This could be taken to mean that the
> > new resource is not
> > the same resource moved to a new location, but a different resource.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > "Slein, Judith A" <JSlein@crt.xerox.com> on 09/08/99 09:34:03 AM
> >
> > To:   "'Yaron Goland (Exchange)'" <yarong@Exchange.Microsoft.com>,
> >       w3c-dist-auth@w3.org
> > cc:
> >
> > Subject:  RE: Bindings, Locks, and MOVE
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > The intention is that if a resource is copied or moved into a
> > tree that is
> > locked, the lock on the tree remains in force.
> >
> > We didn't discuss the case where you are doing a MOVE, and
> > the resource
> > being moved is locked, and it is being moved into a
> collection that is
> > locked.  The lock on the collection will certainly stay in
> > force, but we
> > need to decide whether the lock on the resource being MOVEd
> > will be lost or
> > whether the MOVE will fail.  I guess my own opinion is that
> > the MOVE should
> > fail, since that maintains a consistent position that the
> > state of a MOVEd
> > resource should be unaffected by the move; if its lock state
> > would have to
> > be changed, the move should fail.
> >
> > Judith A. Slein
> > XR&T/Xerox Architecture Center
> > jslein@crt.xerox.com
> > 8*222-5169
> >
> >
> > > -----Original Message-----
> > > From: Yaron Goland (Exchange)
> [mailto:yarong@Exchange.Microsoft.com]
> > > Sent: Tuesday, September 07, 1999 8:49 PM
> > > To: 'Slein, Judith A'; 'Greg Stein'; w3c-dist-auth@w3.org
> > > Subject: RE: Bindings, Locks, and MOVE
> > >
> > >
> > > Phew!!! I couldn't believe what I was reading regarding write
> > > locks. What
> > > use is a write lock that only sometimes is a write lock?
> > > Yikes. I'm glad
> > > that is dead.
> > >
> > > However there is still a point in the original post that
> > > concerns me. Let's
> > > see if I understand the proposal:
> > >
> > > When copying a resource into a tree that is currently locked
> > > then the lock
> > > on that tree is lost?
> > >
> > > Is that the proposal for how to handle locks at the
> > > destination of a copied
> > > resource? That is my reading of the paragraph Judy provided.
> > >
> > >         Yaron
> > >
> > > > -----Original Message-----
> > > > From: Slein, Judith A [mailto:JSlein@crt.xerox.com]
> > > > Sent: Tue, September 07, 1999 7:19 AM
> > > > To: 'Greg Stein'; w3c-dist-auth@w3.org
> > > > Subject: RE: Bindings, Locks, and MOVE
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > Thanks for bringing the discussion back to earth.
> > > >
> > > > I agree with you that the compromise of saying that servers
> > > > SHOULD protect
> > > > the path of the Request-URI used in locking a resource is a
> > > > poor one.  It
> > > > doesn't respond to the issue that was raised, and it
> > > > needlessly muddies the
> > > > waters for clients, which now don't know whether the path
> > > > will be protected
> > > > or not.
> > > >
> > > > I like your suggestion that we keep the MUST language, but
> > > > state that it
> > > > applies only to write locks.
> > > >
> > > > --Judy
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > > -----Original Message-----
> > > > > From: Greg Stein [mailto:gstein@lyra.org]
> > > > > Sent: Friday, September 03, 1999 3:24 AM
> > > > > To: w3c-dist-auth@w3.org
> > > > > Subject: Re: Bindings, Locks, and MOVE
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > > This whole thread (post-Judy's message) seems to be picking
> > > > out a very
> > > > > minor detail of her post. Personally, I find this nit-picking
> > > > > of detail
> > > > > counter to the goal of her original post: "test its
> > > > > conclusions with the
> > > > > mailing list members."
> > > > >
> > > > > For myself (and mod_dav), the first "AGREED" portion
> > > makes complete
> > > > > sense, and I do agree with it.
> > > > > [btw, is *anybody* going to be implementing cross-server
> > > > MOVE/COPY? is
> > > > > it necessary to have that feature in the spec at all? of the
> > > > > umpteen DAV
> > > > > servers out there now, I don't know any that do this or plan
> > > > > to do this.
> > > > > It would be nice to cut the thing and not worry about it.]
> > > > >
> > > > > The second "AGREED" portion does not make a whole lot of
> > > sense. The
> > > > > commentary states that the position is too strong [because it
> > > > > might not
> > > > > make sense with other types of locks]. Are there other locks
> > > > > out there?
> > > > > Do people have concrete, useful examples? I haven't heard
> > > > of anything
> > > > > besides a write-lock yet. Regardless, I think it should be
> > > > enforced in
> > > > > the spec that a write-lock MUST have guaranteed
> > protection of the
> > > > > Request-URI. Put in some language that says other locks can
> > > > define the
> > > > > MUST/SHOULD nature of protection. Otherwise, leave it in
> > > > the intuitive
> > > > > state: a write lock says that others cannot monkey with
> > your URI.
> > > > >
> > > > > Cheers,
> > > > > -g
> > > > >
> > > > > Edgar Schwarz wrote:
> > > > > >
> > > > > > On Thu, 2 Sep 1999, Geoffrey M. Clemm wrote:
> > > > > >
> > > > > > >    From: ccjason@us.ibm.com
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > >    <JS>
> > > > > > >    This discussion began with Yaron's comment that saying
> > > > > that "it MUST NOT be
> > > > > > >    possible for a principal other than the lock owner to
> > > > > make a locked resource
> > > > > > >    inaccessible via the URI mapping used to lock the
> > > > > resource" is too strong.
> > > > > > >    It may make sense for write locks as defined in RFC
> > > > > 2518, but may not make
> > > > > > >    sense for other sorts of locks that don't restrict
> > > > > MOVE and DELETE.
> > > > > > >    </JS>
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > >    I believe that this is not specific to any particular
> > > > > type of locks.  All
> > > > > > >    clients need to insure that they have at the very
> > > > > least a way to unlock
> > > > > > >    the the locks they have created.  I assume that to
> > > > > unlock (a resource), we
> > > > > > >    have to provide a URI of a (the?) resource locked by
> > > > > that lock... so if
> > > > > > >    someone else changes the URI, it's
> > > > > > >    very likely that we're not going to be able to figure
> > > > > out what the new
> > > > > > >    URI is... and will have to leave the lock around until
> > > > > it times out.
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > <gmc> Since the server needs to deal with this in case
> > > > > the client just
> > > > > > > neglects to remove the lock, and if having another client
> > > > > MOVE your
> > > > > > > locked resource is a rare occurrence (which I believe
> > > > it is), then
> > > > > > > this does not seem to be especially problematical.
> > > > > > Would it be possible to say:
> > > > > >   If a locked resource is moved the server SHOULD create
> > > > a indirect
> > > > > >   reference resource which should exist for some
> > sensible time.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Yes I know, it's complicating the server :-)
> > > > > > I imagine the above happening perhaps when somebody is
> > > > reorganizing
> > > > > > a directory structure and deep in the collections
> > there are some
> > > > > > locked resources.
> > > > > > So the lock owner at least has a decent chance to find
> > > > out where his
> > > > > > resource has gone to.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Regards, Edgar
> > > > > >
> > > > > > --
> > > > > > Edgar.Schwarz@de.bosch.com ON/EMS1, 07191/13-3382
> > > > > Niklaus Wirth:
> > > > > > Privat kann jeder soviel C programmieren oder Videos
> > > > > ansehen wie er mag.
> > > > > > Albert Einstein:  Mach es so einfach wie moeglich, aber
> > > > > nicht einfacher.
> > > > >
> > > > > --
> > > > > Greg Stein, http://www.lyra.org/
> > > > >
> > > >
> > >
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
>
>
Received on Friday, 10 September 1999 16:23:48 GMT

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