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Re: Content-Location is your friend

From: Mark Baker <distobj@acm.org>
Date: Fri, 18 Jan 2002 11:16:38 -0500 (EST)
Message-Id: <200201181616.LAA28919@markbaker.ca>
To: patrick.stickler@nokia.com (Patrick Stickler)
Cc: urn-ietf@lists.netsol.com (URN), uri@w3.org (URI)
> > What should one do when they need to make these same kinds of assertions
> > about an existing URI scheme that doesn't already support them (perhaps
> > because it's opaque)?  For example, what if the owner of example.org
> > wants to assert that http://example.org/foo/bar implies the existence of
> > http://example.org/foo and http://example.org/?
> 
> But it does. Although it is rather implicit IMO in the definition
> of hierarchical URIs, the individual path components are distinct
> and hence can be referenced individually.

They can be referenced, but so can any local path.  That's not the same
as asserting that they actually identify a resource.

Hierarchical naming does not in general imply the existence of resources
elsewhere in that same hierarchy.  If you think you've found some text
to the contrary, I'd appreciate a pointer though, as I've been looking
into the opacity qualities of RFC 2396 recently.

The point here being that this assertion should be able to be made about
any URI, not just ones using a particular URI scheme.  So the most
general model for this would be entirely opaque URIs, and explicit
assertions made about them.

> Note that that does *not* mean that subpaths correlate to URIs,
> and this is the case also with 'hrn:' and 'voc:', only that one
> can deduce that such subpaths might be valid URIs and in the case
> of 'hrn:' and 'voc:' *if* they correlate to resources, there is
> a defined superordinate/subordinate relation.

Sorry, I don't follow.

> Obviously, though, it is difficult to rebake a cake, and if you
> put the wrong ingredients into it...  cest la vie...  ;-)

That sounds like it would be funny, if I understood the context.
8-)

MB
-- 
Mark Baker, Chief Science Officer, Planetfred, Inc.
Ottawa, Ontario, CANADA.      mbaker@planetfred.com
http://www.markbaker.ca   http://www.planetfred.com
Received on Friday, 18 January 2002 11:15:21 GMT

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