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HTML-5

From: Charlie M <i2cmars@yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Oct 2010 15:39:04 +0000
Message-Id: <484465.40444.qm@web51008.mail.re2.yahoo.com>
To: site-comments@w3.org
I would like to know how, and where, I can make comments / feedback as  
a computer professional about the additional features in HTML-5.

Mainly, I am concerned about security; allowing access to my email,  
even just the 'Subject' line, is far more than I want without  
explicitly allowing it.

Also, after reading the NYTimes story which featured some comments  
from Samy Kamkar, and his "Evercookie" ( "it stores information in at  
least 10 places on a computer, far more than usually found. It  
combines traditional tracking tools with new features that come with  
the new Web language"), I am very concerned that, even if you try to  
restrict coders from gaining too much access, that any mistakes in  
HTML-5 will allow downloading of MY (read that as "Restricted, never  
to be seen, copyrighted" material), personal pictures, etc.

As with anything Microsoft, where they activate a computer with ALL  
defenses turned off and allowing complete "from outside" access, you  
seem to be going that way. However, PROTECTION and PRIVACY should be  
the FIRST AND FOREMOST CONCERN.

For starters, storing information should be restricted to 1 or 2  
places on a PC, all browsers should have a 'directory Tree' structure  
for options - click the 'main folder' and ALL tracking features under  
it are turned 'off', but to turn 'on' a tracking feature should  
require clicking each 'box', and all browsers should have the same  
heading for these security features so anyone can easily find them.  
YOU are making HTML-5 --- you CAN make these restrictions mandatory.

Personally, if I find out my security is compromised, I plan to find  
the best lawyer available and go after everyone involved. But if I  
have control of my PC, then any failure if my fault, not yours.

Thank You,
Charles Miller
Received on Monday, 11 October 2010 15:43:32 GMT

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