W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > semantic-web@w3.org > March 2010

Re: longevity of names

From: Karl Dubost <karl+w3c@la-grange.net>
Date: Mon, 29 Mar 2010 23:58:35 -0400
Message-Id: <CF06E302-D9AE-4BFB-B4C9-8960092983FE@la-grange.net>
Cc: Semantic Web <semantic-web@w3.org>
To: Danny Ayers <danny.ayers@gmail.com>

Le 25 mars 2010 à 00:14, Danny Ayers a écrit :
> Do we care? Life expectancy of data, boys and girls?

ok, a bit of linked data sci-fi ;)

Life = bio. What do bio-organism do well: reproduce (with small mutations) and multiply

What makes libraries very powerful in the era of book-as-an-object? Copies of the same book in many places.  Is data life expectancy related to the number of copies of this data. I tend to believe a bit to that.

What makes data fragile on the Web, not that much that they change names (it's happening and it's painful) but I would say more specifically the unique copy for each of them.

For example, I think my Web site is on my laptop, on my server, and maybe some pages saved on some computers somewhere. But The most amazing thing being the backup copy that my mother has done of all my blog posts on… paper. Print!


P2P is somehow very robust because distributed.
It is easier to have copies of Usenet posts than say Web pages.
Mailing-lists are good if people keep them in their boxes.

The initial archives of the Web discussions were lost until someone got them from his own private mailbox.
http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/www-talk/
the archives of 1993 and 1994 are still not back in place at W3C.
http://1997.webhistory.org/www.lists/

What saved these data, copies, more than names (URI).


-- 
Karl Dubost
Montréal, QC, Canada
http://www.la-grange.net/karl/
Received on Tuesday, 30 March 2010 03:58:51 UTC

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