W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > semantic-web@w3.org > July 2010

Re: Show me the money - (was Subjects as Literals)

From: Kingsley Idehen <kidehen@openlinksw.com>
Date: Fri, 02 Jul 2010 09:10:40 -0400
Message-ID: <4C2DE550.60503@openlinksw.com>
To: Patrick Durusau <patrick@durusau.net>
CC: Linked Data community <public-lod@w3.org>, Semantic Web <semantic-web@w3.org>
Patrick Durusau wrote:
> Henry,
>
> Another reason why the SW is failing:
>
>> You don't see it as a need because you don't think of the options you 
>> are missing. Like people in 1800 did not think horses were slow, 
>> because they did not consider that they could fly. Or if they did 
>> think of that it was just as a dream.
>>
>> Or closer to home, in the 80ies most people did not miss getting 
>> information quickly, the library was around the corner. Or they did 
>> not miss buying their tickets online.
>>
>> You need a bit of imagination to see what you are missing. Which is 
>> why a lot of people stop dreaming.
>> It's painful.
>>    
>
> I would reply with equally ad hominem remarks but it isn't worth the 
> effort.
Patrick,

There is no Semantic Web.
There will be no Semantic Web.
There was/is a Semantic Web Project.
Key output from the Semantic Web Project is the burgeoning Web of Linked 
Data.

The Web of Linked Data enhances what can be done with the Web.

We just need to get RDF out of the way re. distractions!

Linking Data across Data Spaces offers unique value that's bubbling up 
the value chain, exponentially.

As I once said. Obama is going to be remembered for Linked Open Data 
rather than healthcare.

Just stay tuned!


Kingsley
>
> Patrick
>
> On 7/2/2010 7:03 AM, Henry Story wrote:
>> On 2 Jul 2010, at 12:49, Patrick Durusau wrote:
>>
>>   
>>> Henry,
>>>
>>> On 7/2/2010 6:03 AM, Henry Story wrote:
>>>     
>>>> On 2 Jul 2010, at 11:57, Patrick Durusau wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>       
>>>>> On 7/2/2010 5:27 AM, Ian Davis wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>         
>>>>>> On Fri, Jul 2, 2010 at 10:19 AM, Patrick 
>>>>>> Durusau<patrick@durusau.net>    wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>           
>>>>>>> I make this point in another post this morning but is your 
>>>>>>> argument that
>>>>>>> investment by vendors =
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>              
>>>>>> I think I just answered it there, before reading this message. 
>>>>>> Let me
>>>>>> know if not!
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>            
>>>>> I think you made a very good point about needing examples so user 
>>>>> can say: "I want to do that."
>>>>>
>>>>> Which was one of the strong points of HTML.
>>>>>
>>>>>          
>>>> Ok, what users will want is the Social Web. And here is the way to 
>>>> convince people:
>>>> "The Social Network Privacy Mess: Why we Need the Social Web"
>>>>
>>>>     http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=994DvSJZyww&feature=channel
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> ( This can of course be improved) The general ideas should be clear:
>>>>
>>>>   dystopia: we cannot have all social data centralised on one server.
>>>>   utopia: there is a lot of money to be made in creating the social 
>>>> web, and thereby
>>>>      increasing democracy in the world.
>>>>
>>>>   This can ONLY be done with linked data. And there is a real need 
>>>> for it.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>        
>>> Several presumptions:
>>>
>>> 1) "there is a lot of money to be made creating the social web" - ? 
>>> On what economic model? Advertising? Can't simply presume that money 
>>> can be made.
>>>      
>> Look I could leave that to you as an exercise to the reader. I don't 
>> know why people want me
>> to give them answers also on how to make money. Sometimes you have to 
>> think for yourself.
>>
>> Just think how much bigger a global social web is. Then think 
>> everyone connecting to everyone.
>> Then think that perhaps you could sell software to firms that have 
>> certain needs, to doctors and hostpitals that have other needs, to 
>> universities, etc. etc...
>>
>> It's up to your imagination really.
>>
>>   
>>> 2) "thereby increasing democracy in the world" - ??? Not real sure 
>>> what that has to do with social networks. However popular 
>>> "increasing democracy" may be as a slogan, it is like "fighting 
>>> terrorism."
>>>      
>> Because people can publish their own data, and control what they say 
>> and to whome they say it a lot more.
>>
>>   
>>> Different governments and populations have different definitions for 
>>> both. I have my own preferences but realize there are different 
>>> definitions used by others.
>>>      
>> I don't care what dictators think about democracy frankly.
>>
>>
>>   
>>> 3) "can ONLY be done with linked data." Really? Seems like the phone 
>>> companies from your example did it long before linked data.
>>>      
>>
>> Phone companies do something very simple: connect phones. The 
>> internet connects computers. The web connects pages. You need the 
>> semantic web to connect things (and hence people)
>>
>>
>>   
>>> 4) "there is a real need for it." ? I get as annoyed as anyone with 
>>> the multiple logins and universities do have some common logins for 
>>> their internal systems but I am not sure I would describe it as a need.
>>>      
>> You don't see it as a need because you don't think of the options you 
>> are missing. Like people in 1800 did not think horses were slow, 
>> because they did not consider that they could fly. Or if they did 
>> think of that it was just as a dream.
>>
>> Or closer to home, in the 80ies most people did not miss getting 
>> information quickly, the library was around the corner. Or they did 
>> not miss buying their tickets online.
>>
>> You need a bit of imagination to see what you are missing. Which is 
>> why a lot of people stop dreaming.
>> It's painful.
>>
>>   
>>> At least until some survey shows that a large number of users are 
>>> willing to pay for such a service.
>>>      
>> I have never heard of an inventor making surveys to test things out. 
>> That is nonsense. At most what that can tell you is little details, 
>> ways to fine tune a system. It will never let you see the big changes 
>> coming.
>>
>>   
>>> Hope you are looking forward to a great weekend!
>>>      
>> you too.
>>
>>   
>>> Patrick
>>>
>>>     
>>>>     Henry
>>>>
>>>>        
>>> -- 
>>> Patrick Durusau
>>> patrick@durusau.net
>>> Chair, V1 - US TAG to JTC 1/SC 34
>>> Convener, JTC 1/SC 34/WG 3 (Topic Maps)
>>> Editor, OpenDocument Format TC (OASIS), Project Editor ISO/IEC 26300
>>> Co-Editor, ISO/IEC 13250-1, 13250-5 (Topic Maps)
>>>
>>> Another Word For It (blog): http://tm.durusau.net
>>> Homepage: http://www.durusau.net
>>> Twitter: patrickDurusau
>>>
>>>      
>>
>>    
>


-- 

Regards,

Kingsley Idehen	      
President & CEO 
OpenLink Software     
Web: http://www.openlinksw.com
Weblog: http://www.openlinksw.com/blog/~kidehen
Twitter/Identi.ca: kidehen 
Received on Friday, 2 July 2010 13:11:09 UTC

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