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Re: "destabilizing core technologies: was Re: An RDF wishlist

From: Kingsley Idehen <kidehen@openlinksw.com>
Date: Fri, 02 Jul 2010 09:04:18 -0400
Message-ID: <4C2DE3D2.1050903@openlinksw.com>
To: Patrick Durusau <patrick@durusau.net>
CC: Linked Data community <public-lod@w3.org>, Semantic Web <semantic-web@w3.org>
Patrick Durusau wrote:
> Henry,
>
> On 7/2/2010 5:58 AM, Henry Story wrote:
>> On 2 Jul 2010, at 11:39, Patrick Durusau wrote:
>>
>>   
>>> Good point. But the basic tools to handle data have been around for 
>>> a long time.
>>>      
>> The web could only get going in the 90ies when
>>
>>    1) Windows 95 become (A GUI) widely deployed and relatively stable 
>> and had support for threads
>>    2) modems were cheap and available
>>    [3 the soviet unions had fallen, so the fear mongers had no 
>> security buttons to press]
>>
>> In 1997 the SSL layer (https) gave an extra boost as it made commerce 
>> possible.
>>
>>    
> Err, you are omitting one critical fact. The one that lead to TBL's 
> paper being rejected from the hypertext conference. Links could fail.

And there lies the critical misconception.

404 is the feature that debunked the misconception and lead to the Web 
scaling. How about that?

What happened to the Hypertext Conference? What happened to the Web and 
zillion Web themed conferences later?

The ingenuity of the 404 is that is maps reality. We are all imperfect, 
our imperfections are features rather than bugs!

TimBL flipped the script.

More flipping to come re. business model too, but you need to grok the 
"Magic of Being You!" first.


>
> That is reportedly one of the critical failings of early hypertext 
> systems was that links could not be allowed to fail. That blocked any 
> sort of global scaling.
>
> Hmmm, wonder what happens when links fail with RDF, considering that 
> it requires the yet to be implemented 303 solution?

See my comments above.

The pursuit of globally perfect statements in the RDF realm is one of 
its many flaws.

If I recall, Pat Hayes once said to me: Take DBpedia down! Just because 
of some erroneous data. My reply to him was: No, I can fix the records 
without taking DBpedia down, the data is in a DBMS where the data is 
partitioned using Named Graphs.  etc..  As of today, he even suggest I 
stop using RDF (truly LOL!!).

[SNIP]

-- 

Regards,

Kingsley Idehen	      
President & CEO 
OpenLink Software     
Web: http://www.openlinksw.com
Weblog: http://www.openlinksw.com/blog/~kidehen
Twitter/Identi.ca: kidehen 
Received on Friday, 2 July 2010 13:04:47 UTC

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