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Re: stating that something doesn't exist

From: Alan Ruttenberg <alanruttenberg@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 22 May 2008 23:28:22 -0400
Cc: <semantic-web@w3.org>
Message-Id: <6274B912-0B34-4C50-926A-2C7FC6C04E2C@gmail.com>
To: "Johnson, Matthew C. (LNG-HBE)" <Matthew.C.Johnson@lexisnexis.com>


On May 22, 2008, at 8:39 AM, Johnson, Matthew C. (LNG-HBE) wrote:

> [[MCJ]] I suppose that given the open world assumption, someone else
> would not know this unless there was an explicit mysch:notLinksTo
> assertion or one relied upon the interpretation of a query (that shows
> that mysch:linksTo does not exist between pub 2 and pub 3.  This is  
> what
> I'm coming around to anyway...  Perhaps I'm really struggling with the
> notion of open world assumptions vs. closed.  In SQL (closed world),  
> one
> frequently uses "select count(*) ..." in order to determine whether a
> relationship exists.  In the open web, I can understand that one  
> cannot
> assume that a given graph incorporates absolutely every statement  
> [about
> a given thing] but I wonder whether if it is ok to make such an
> assumption within one's own [possibly local/corporate] domain?  Would
> this be considered an abuse of OWL's and RDF's intent?

I think that one has to make one's own judgements. The intent of the  
open world assumption is to not make a global assumption for  
everybody. Certainly, if within your organization you are comfortable  
that you have adequate information to make decisions, no one is going  
to argue with that.

-Alan
Received on Friday, 23 May 2008 03:29:04 GMT

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