W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > semantic-web@w3.org > January 2008

Re: patents and academia

From: Andreas Langegger <andreas.langegger@gmx.at>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 12:44:51 +0100
Message-Id: <41F8D620-D862-48A9-BDB7-576243D0CF90@gmx.at>
To: semantic-web@w3.org

one does not necessarily be academic to disapprove software idea  
patents, at least in cases when they stall research and progress like  
it's obviously the case with an patent being 11 years old... why  
haven't you commercially exploit it already? - a patent should protect  
early copiers from stealing one's ideas before growing and getting  
into the market - in such cases, I support patents. But I totally  
disapprove trading patents as resources or just making money by  
sitting on them, do nothing, and sue others who want to bring mankind  
some steps forward!

Andy


> I think this thread is stale but ...
>
>
>
> Ignazio wrote:
>
>
>
> > More to the point of the thread, in which way do you see Dudley's  
> patent
>
> > as an innovation? Using any of the available technologies he uses as
>
> > example on his site, I mean? the XML example is equivalent to the  
> use I
>
> > made of XML in the first project I worked on when I learned it (it  
> used
>
> > to be online but it's not there any more), meaning there were  
> metadata
>
> > about people and geolocations, on a web page, passed back and  
> forth and
>
> > used to perform operations. Mine was a third year project, built by
>
> > three not exceptionally clever students (/me not exceptionally  
> clever),
>
> > and the year was 1998 or 1999.
>
>
>
> 1. My patents have a priority (initial filing) date of 1997/Feb/21.
>
>
>
> 2. I have diligently searched and asked people likely to know but I
>
>  have not yet found any evidence of prior art which would invalidate
>
>  the claims in my patent.
>
>
>
> 3. An invention is still an invention regardless of whether the  
> inventor
>
>  is clever or not.
>
>
>
> 4. I like academics, they are often repositories and inventors of  
> marvellous
>
>  ideas but are generally poor at the bloody daily grind of
> commercialization.
>
>  And that is OK because there are people who are very good at it.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Dipl.-Ing.(FH) Andreas Langegger
Institute for Applied Knowledge Processing
Johannes Kepler University Linz
A-4040 Linz, Altenberger Straße 69
http://www.langegger.at
Received on Wednesday, 23 January 2008 11:45:45 GMT

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