W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-xg-socialweb@w3.org > January 2010

Re: Kim Cameron's Laws of Identity

From: Kaliya <kaliya@mac.com>
Date: Wed, 20 Jan 2010 15:50:36 -0800
Message-id: <5F3394EF-833A-4D40-A0CD-1824E2CFBC01@mac.com>
To: public-xg-socialweb@w3.org
The Data Portability Project is working on tools to support website  
being clearer to users about their portability policies
http://wiki.dataportability.org/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=4490392

and I know Mozilla is currently doing work in this area.
https://wiki.mozilla.org/Drumbeat/website/projects/privacyicons

-Kaliya



On Jan 20, 2010, at 3:03 PM, Melvin Carvalho wrote:

> This is great also:
>
> A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web
> Authored by Joseph Smarr, Marc Canter, Robert Scoble, and Michael  
> Arrington
>
> http://opensocialweb.org/2007/09/05/bill-of-rights/
>
> We publicly assert that all users of the social web are entitled to  
> certain fundamental rights, specifically:
> Ownership of their own personal information, including:
> - their own profile data
> - the list of people they are connected to
> - the activity stream of content they create;
> - Control of whether and how such personal information is shared  
> with others; and
> - Freedom to grant persistent access to their personal information  
> to trusted external sites.
>
> Sites supporting these rights shall:
> - Allow their users to syndicate their own profile data, their  
> friends list, and the data that’s shared with them via the service,  
> using a persistent URL or API token and open data formats;
> - Allow their users to syndicate their own stream of activity  
> outside the site;
> - Allow their users to link from their profile pages to external  
> identifiers in a public way; and
> - Allow their users to discover who else they know is also on their  
> site, using the same external identifiers made available for lookup  
> within the service.
>
>
> On Wed, Jan 20, 2010 at 11:35 PM, Harry Halpin <hhalpin@ibiblio.org>  
> wrote:
> Following our phone call, here's some other "rules" for social web
> work, including identity:
>
> 1. User Control and Consent:
>
>    Digital identity systems must only reveal information identifying
> a user with the user’s consent.
>
> 2. Limited Disclosure for Limited Use
>
>    The solution which discloses the least identifying information and
> best limits its use is the most stable, long-term solution.
>
> 3. The Law of Fewest Parties
>
>    Digital identity systems must limit disclosure of identifying
> information to parties having a necessary and justifiable place in a
> given identity relationship.
>
> 4. Directed Identity
>
>    A universal identity metasystem must support both
> “omnidirectional” identifiers for use by public entities and
> “unidirectional” identifiers for private entities, thus facilitating
> discovery while preventing unnecessary release of correlation handles.
>
> 5. Pluralism of Operators and Technologies:
>
>    A universal identity metasystem must channel and enable the
> interworking of multiple identity technologies run by multiple
> identity providers.
>
> 6. Human Integration:
>
>    A unifying identity metasystem must define the human user as a
> component integrated through protected and unambiguous human-machine
> communications.
>
> 7. Consistent Experience Across Contexts:
>
>    A unifying identity metasystem must provide a simple consistent
> experience while enabling separation of contexts through multiple
> operators and technologies.
>
> In full, on his website [1].
>
> Here's a poster, quite nice [2].
>
> [1] http://www.identityblog.com/?p=353
> [2] http://www.identityblog.com/wp-content/images/2009/06/7_Laws_of_Identity.jpg
>
>
Received on Wednesday, 20 January 2010 23:51:11 UTC

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