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EMOXG: "links to the rest of the world" XML spec ideas

From: Ian Wilson <ian@emotionai.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2008 03:08:31 -0500
To: "firstname lastname" <public-xg-emotion@w3.org>
Message-Id: <45155.1217405311@orgoo.com>

Hi all,



this is our report about possible specification for &quot;links to the rest

of the world&quot; as recorded in [7]



General remarks:

The main question for things that are not directly related to

emotion/affect is: shall we specify them ourself or advise the use of

similar xml specifications (make or buy)? 



arguments to use existing specifications:

  a. It is not core to Emotion, so not worth us inventing something new

  b. Many specifications exist

  c. Using a format from one of our &quot;neighbors&quot; will help foster closer integration of our groups / standards



arguments for own specification:

  a. other specifications have different focus: more &quot;workaround&quot; than

  real fit.

  b. uncomplete specification might be cumbersome to use

  b. other specifications (EMMA, SMIL) also deliver &quot;complete service&quot;



In this report we try to show both approaches for consideration.



Nearby specifications used in this report (other suggestions WELCOME):

A) HTML (Hypertext Markup Language)

html is a ML to format docs in browsers [2].

B) SMIL (Synchronized Multimedia Integration Language)

smil is a markup to format streaming media shows [3].

C) EMMA (Extensible MultiModal Annotation Markup Language)

emma is a markup describe multimodal interaction [4]. 

D) MIME types

content types defined by the MIME group include &quot;text/html&quot;, &quot;image/png&quot;, &quot;image/gif&quot;, &quot;video/mpeg&quot;, &quot;text/css&quot;, and

&quot;audio/basic&quot; [6] 





Now we go through the three requirements of &quot;links to the rest of the

world&quot;: 

1. &quot;links to media&quot;, 2. &quot;position on a timeline / emotion timing&quot; and 3. &quot;semantics of links&quot;.

 

Links 1. Links to media

  cite requirements [1];

  &quot;The emotion markup must be able to refer to external media of various

  kinds, including videos, pictures, audio files, and nodes in an XML

  document.&quot;

  

  SUGGESTION a) recommend use of other spec:

    i) with HTML

     Link comes in two flavours, &quot;a&quot; and &quot;link&quot;, the difference between 

     tag and  tag is that links may only appear in the header of a

     html doc, will not be displayed and is not allowed to have an end-tag.

     EXAMPLE

      

     

    ii) with SMIL

     One could use the SMIL  tag and its synonyms

    &quot;animation&quot;, &quot;audio&quot;, &quot;img&quot;, &quot;text&quot;, &quot;textstream&quot; and &quot;video&quot;. 

     EXAMPLE

      

      

    iii) with EMMA

     There is no own tag for source-signals, only an attribute to the &quot;interpretation&quot;-tag

     EXAMPLE

      

      

        emma:medium=&quot;acoustic&quot; emma:mode=&quot;voice&quot;/&gt; 

  

  SUGGESTION b) define an own tag for links to media:

    Because the application of the other MLs differs from that of the EmotionML,

    we might define our own link and baptize it, perhaps, &quot;media&quot;. 

    Of course we still can use URIs [5] and MIME types [6].

    EXAMPLE

     

     

    

Links 2. Position on a time line in externally linked objects and

  cite requirements [1]:

  &quot;The emotion markup must provide a mechanism for complementing a link

  to media with timing information, in order to further specify the

  scope of the link.&quot;

  Together with

  Core 8. Emotion timing: &quot;The emotion markup must provide a generic mechanism for temporal scope.&quot;

  

  Generally spoken we could use for durations the clock value description for

  time description, as specified in [8]. 

  An example is 

   02:30:03 = 2 hours, 30 minutes and 3 seconds or 30s = 30 seconds. 

  For absolute values we might use, like EMMA, the number of milliseconds since 1

  January 1970.



  SUGGESTION a) recommend use of other spec:

    i) with EMMA

     As Emma deals with multiple input events, its time support is

     specialized on events starting relative to other events.

     EXAMPLE

     

     

       emma:time-ref-uri=&quot;#int1&quot;

       emma:time-ref-anchor-point=&quot;start&quot;

       emma:offset-to-start=&quot;5000&quot;

       emma:duration=&quot;2300&quot;

     /&gt;

  

    ii) with SMIL

     Because SMIL is about displaying streams of multimedia objects, it

     has support for very complex timed events running in parallel or

     sequential. A very simple example is this:

     EXAMPLE

     

       Show this text for a short period.

     


  

  SUGGESTION b) define own attributes for timing information

    We than have to decide whether timing shall be expressed by 

       i) an explicit own element:

          EXAMPLE

           

           

           

            

          

         or, 

       ii) implicitely, as a set of timing attributes that are valid for

          specific elements, like EMMA and SMIL do,

          EXAMPLE

           

           

           

          



    In order to fulfil requirement 8 iii), the referential description of

    timing (see [1]), we could use the Emma syntax: and define two

    elements:  and  that can have timing attributes.

    

    This would be an example for &quot;start 2 seconds before utterance starts and

    ends with the second noun-phrase...&quot; (with namespaces)

    EXAMPLE

    

    

     

      

      

        emma:time-ref-anchor-point=&quot;start&quot;

        emma:offset-to-start=&quot;2s&quot; /&gt;

      

        emma:time-ref-anchor-point=&quot;end&quot;

        emma:offset-to-start=&quot;0&quot; /&gt;

     

  

   Requirement 8 iv) 

   &quot;a sampling mechanism providing values for variables at evenly

   spaced time intervals.&quot; 

   needs clarification, but perhaps should not be a MUST-HAVE requirement?

  

Links 3. The semantics of links to the &quot;rest of the world&quot;

  cite requirements [1];

  &quot;The emotion markup must provide a mechanism for assigning meaning to

  those links. The following initial types of meaning are envisaged:

      * The experiencer (who &quot;has&quot; the emotion);

      * The observable behaviour &quot;expressing&quot; the emotion;

      * The trigger/cause/emotion-eliciting event of the emotion;

      * The object/target of the emotion (the thing that the emotion is about)....&quot;

  

  SUGGESTION:  

  This reminds a bit of our category discussion [9], where we also

  have the problem to allow users to define an own set but also want to

  suggest some pre-defined.

  We suggest to solve it in a similar fashion by defining an element, perhaps

  called &quot;link&quot;, that takes as attributes

  - a role, to declare the &quot;semantic role&quot; of the link

  - a src, similar to audio src: the target url

  - a set, similar to the category set attribute, in order to point to

    the set of pssible semantic roles.

  Here's an example of Jane Doe who is pleased about a concert performed

  by the Beatles, described by the roles suggested in the requirements:

  EXAMPLE

   

    

    

      src=&quot;http://example.org/persons/janeDoe&quot;/&gt;

    

      src=&quot;http://example.org/behaviours/throwArmsUp&quot;/&gt;

    

      src=&quot;http://gigs.org/events/1967/gig1234&quot;/&gt;

    

      src=&quot;http://www.beatles.com&quot;/&gt;

  



added....



This requirement seems to really be in 2 parts, a. the link and b. the semantics.

In this case we could mix this specification and use one of the link examples 

above but specify a new emotion tag for the semantics, which are emotion specific.



 

    

    

        

    







[1] 
http://www.w3.org/2005/Incubator/emotion/XGR-requirements-20080513/


[2] http://www.w3.org/TR/html401/struct/links.html


[3] http://www.w3.org/TR/2008/CR-SMIL3-20080115/smil-extended-media-object.html#edef-ref


[4] http://www.w3.org/TR/emma/


[5] http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3986


[6] http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc2387


[7] http://www.w3.org/2008/07/03-emotion-minutes.html#action01


[8] http://www.w3.org/TR/SMIL3/smil-timing.html#Timing-ClockValueSyntax


[9] http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/public-xg-emotion/2008Jul/0000.html






  

 


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