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reasoning about interaction patterns

From: Roberto Lucchi <lucchi@cs.unibo.it>
Date: Tue, 13 Sep 2005 12:31:19 +0200 (CEST)
To: public-ws-chor@w3.org
Cc: Claudio Guidi <cguidi@cs.unibo.it>
Message-ID: <Pine.LNX.4.62.0509131205330.12913@sarastro.cs.unibo.it>

Dear all,

I would like to point out that a paper which deals with choreography 
languages and in particular on the interaction patterns when alignment 
property is considered has been published in the proceeding of 2nd 
International Workshop on Web Services and Formal Methods WS-FM'05, LNCS 
3670.

Here we report the abstract, we hope this can help and stimulate 
the discussion about the right interaction patterns that should be used 
at the choreography level.

Abstract:
Choreography languages provide a top-view design way for
describing complex systems composed of services distributed over the
network. The basic building block of such languages is the interaction
between two peers which are of two kinds: request and request-respond.
WS-CDL, which is the most representative choreography language, supports a 
pattern for programming the request interaction and two patterns
for the request-respond one. Furthermore, it allows to specify if an 
interaction is aligned or not whose meaning is related to the possibility to
control when the interaction completes. In this paper we reason about
interaction patterns by analyzing their adequacy when considering the
fact that they have to support the alignment property. We show the 
inadequacy of the two patterns supporting the request-respond interaction;
one of them because it does not permit to reason on alignment at the
right granularity level and the other one for some expressiveness lacks.

The paper is also available at the following URL:
http://www.cs.unibo.it/~lucchi/pubbl.html

Best regards,
  Roberto
Received on Tuesday, 13 September 2005 10:31:32 GMT

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