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Re: Choreography and Orchestration

From: Monika Solanki <monika@dmu.ac.uk>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2004 18:48:07 +0000
Message-ID: <40195567.5020500@dmu.ac.uk>
To: Steve Ross-Talbot <steve@enigmatec.net>
Cc: public-ws-chor@w3.org

Thanks Steve. This has indeed helped.

-Monika

Steve Ross-Talbot wrote:

>
> Monika,
>
> The simple answer is that orchestration implies a centralised control 
> mechanism (i.e. the conductor in an orchestra), whereas choreography 
> does not (dancers on a stage). In the former the players have a score 
> that they adhere to (in BPEL this might be the abstract BPEL defs for 
> the individual components) and the conductor ensures they all work 
> togther harmoniously (the rest of BPEL). In the latter all the dancers 
> have a choreography and understand their role in the overall dance 
> because it has been agreed or imposed for them.
>
> Orchestration is typically used in a domain of control. Choreography 
> would be used across domain of control to ensure harmony 
> (interoperability etc).
>
> Choreography is sometimes viewed as a peer2peer global model of the 
> external observable behaviour of the interacting components. We can 
> think of this as a global behavioural contract that might be used to 
> generate component stubs (i.e. Skeletal code) and/or with a tool by 
> one or more components that is used to monitor the contract or even 
> statically as input to a tool to reason about the behaviour (are there 
> any deadlock or livelocks in this contract?).
>
> Hope this helps.
>
> Steve T
>
> On 28 Jan 2004, at 19:07, Monika Solanki wrote:
>
>>
>> There has been extensive discussions  on the conceptual differences 
>> between the above two terms. I was interested in documents that 
>> formally capture them. If  such documents exists, it would be great 
>> if someone can forward pointers to them.
>>
>> Thanks,
>>
>> Monika
>> p.s; I have already explored www.ebpml.org
>> -- 
>> **>><<**>><<**>><<**>><<**>><<**>><<**>><<**
>> Monika Solanki
>> Software Technology Research Laboratory(STRL)
>> De Montfort University
>> Hawthorn building, H00.18
>> The Gateway
>> Leicester LE1 9BH, UK
>>
>> phone: +44 (0)116 250 6170 intern: 6170
>> email: monika@dmu.ac.uk
>> web: http://www.cse.dmu.ac.uk/~monika
>> **>><<**>><<**>><<**>><<**>><<**>><<**>><<**
>>
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-- 
**>><<**>><<**>><<**>><<**>><<**>><<**>><<**
Monika Solanki
Software Technology Research Laboratory(STRL)
De Montfort University
Hawthorn building, H00.18
The Gateway
Leicester LE1 9BH, UK

phone: +44 (0)116 250 6170 intern: 6170
email: monika@dmu.ac.uk
web: http://www.cse.dmu.ac.uk/~monika
**>><<**>><<**>><<**>><<**>><<**>><<**>><<**
Received on Thursday, 29 January 2004 20:47:49 UTC

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