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RE: Use Case - Provisioning

From: Champion, Mike <Mike.Champion@SoftwareAG-USA.com>
Date: Sun, 30 Mar 2003 21:31:42 -0500
Message-ID: <9A4FC925410C024792B85198DF1E97E40558EC38@usmsg03.sagus.com>
To: public-ws-chor@w3.org



> -----Original Message-----
> From: Lipton, Paul [mailto:Paul.Lipton@ca.com]
> Sent: Sunday, March 30, 2003 3:59 PM
> To: public-ws-chor@w3.org
> Subject: Use Case - Provisioning
> 
 
> The example called for a new employee to receive the usual junior
> executive faux-oak desk. After checking internal resources that are
> outside of this use case (perhaps empty offices or warehouses 
> within the
> company), no suitable desk is found. So, a choreography is "initiated"
> in which an order is placed with one of the approved 
> suppliers (Company
> B) registered in the private UDDI registry of Company A.

This seems like a fairly promising use case, but the exposition discusses
"choreography" in the most general terms rather than describing a use case
for a formal WS Choreography standard.  I think I can imagine something,
e.g. Company A publishes its WSChoreography document so that its suppliers
"know" that they can respond to an order for a faux oak desk with something
else of comparable price and quality (having read "Zen and the Art of
Motorcycle Maintenance" I wouldn't ever TRY to define "quality" <grin>).
Having a common Choreography description format might not allow software
agents on both sides to automagically negotiate the substitution for the
faux mahogony desk for the one ordered, but it would at least tell
programmers what conditions to look for and where to find the UDDI registry
or WSDL description for the alternate responses.

So,  I'd like to see this scenario recast to make explicit how a WS
Choreography standard would make it easier for people with this (and other)
use cases to do their business.
> 
Received on Sunday, 30 March 2003 21:33:25 GMT

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