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RE: WS-A Issue 27 - Reference to WSDL definition in an EPR

From: David Orchard <dorchard@bea.com>
Date: Thu, 4 Nov 2004 09:02:02 -0800
Message-ID: <32D5845A745BFB429CBDBADA57CD41AF0B783115@ussjex01.amer.bea.com>
To: "Bergersen, Rebecca" <Rebecca.Bergersen@iona.com>, <public-ws-addressing@w3.org>
Cc: "Newcomer, Eric" <Eric.Newcomer@iona.com>, "Vinoski, Stephen" <Steve.Vinoski@iona.com>
Rebecca, I don't see what you are proposing.   You say a reference to
the WSDL definition of a service is sometimes required and must be
included.

 

Is it that EPR adds an optional wsdl20:Location?  Is it that EPR adds an
optional wsdl11:Definition and wsdl20:Description as optional elements?


 

I don't think you are proposing that a wsdl definition is required for
all cases, hence it's optional.  

 

Can you provide a more detailed proposal?

 

Thanks,

dave

 

  _____  

From: public-ws-addressing-request@w3.org
[mailto:public-ws-addressing-request@w3.org] On Behalf Of Bergersen,
Rebecca
Sent: Thursday, November 04, 2004 8:51 AM
To: public-ws-addressing@w3.org
Cc: Newcomer, Eric; Vinoski, Stephen; Bergersen, Rebecca
Subject: WS-A Issue 27 - Reference to WSDL definition in an EPR

 

ISSUE 27 - Reference to WSDL definition in an EPR

  According to the ws-addressing submission, "Endpoint references convey
the information needed to identify/reference a Web service endpoint, and
may be used in several different ways: endpoint references are suitable
for conveying the information needed to access a Web service
endpoint...."  However, in order to assure that the information needed
to access a Web service endpoint, a reference to the WSDL definition of
a service is sometimes required and in those cases must be included as
part of the EPR construct.

 

This requirement derives from several common use cases. For example, in
a communication chain there may be intermediaries that can accept
incoming messages and, in a fully dynamic manner, further dispatch or
route those onward. This is what we do with our products.  The trick is
that the next recipient might use a completely different
protocol/transport/format than what the message came in on. For this
case it is necessary to perform a fully dynamic dispatch by using the
target's WSDL definition and to build dynamic proxies and to bind to the
service over one of the protocol/transport/format combinations it
supports. The whole definition is required so there is access to all the
possible bindings for the service. The WSDL definition is also used in
cases where consumer applications want to avoid compiling in static port
type information, and instead want, for flexibility purposes, late
(runtime) binding to the service. 

 
Received on Thursday, 4 November 2004 17:02:07 GMT

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