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Re: [whatwg] use cases for <figure> without <figcaption>?

From: Steve Faulkner <faulkner.steve@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 20 Jun 2013 22:27:50 +0100
Message-ID: <CA+ri+VnX8UL+UdRFt0aYKpyMF16djXC5kUaenbCXffBvVmCMXg@mail.gmail.com>
To: Xaxio Brandish <xaxiobrandish@gmail.com>
Cc: whatwg <whatwg@whatwg.org>
Hi Xaxio,

<p>Fonts come in many different varieties. The Arial font, for example,
does not have serifs.</p> <div>arial</div>
<p>However, font varieties go beyond simple serif and sans-serif
distinctions. The Old English font is neither of these, instead being
considered a "decorative" font.</p><div>Old English</div>

The above example has meaning with or without the divs, and the placement
of the divs doesn't matter. They could be in a font index at the end of the
document, as long as the data consumer knows to look there if example are
needed.  right?

>The fact that they are enclosed in the <figure> elements means that they
are referenced somewhere, I believe.

so if not referenced somewhere, they should not be in a figure?

--

Regards

SteveF
HTML 5.1 <http://www.w3.org/html/wg/drafts/html/master/>


On 20 June 2013 20:46, Xaxio Brandish <xaxiobrandish@gmail.com> wrote:

> <p>Fonts come in many different varieties. The Arial font, for example,
> does not have serifs.</p> <figure>arial</figure>
> <p>However, font varieties go beyond simple serif and sans-serif
> distinctions. The Old English font is neither of these, instead being
> considered a "decorative" font.</p><figure>Old English</figure>
>
> The above example has meaning with or without the figures, and the
> placement of the figures doesn't matter. They could be in a font index at
> the end of the document, as long as the data consumer knows to look there
> if example are needed.  The fact that they are enclosed in the <figure>
> elements means that they are referenced somewhere, I believe.
>
> When referring to multiple figures containing graphs or tables with really
> long names such as "Number of Children With Orange Dreadlocks With Respect
> to Decade" and "Periods of Time During Which Dreadlocks Are Popular, Where
> Orange Is Popular, and Where They Overlap", it's so much easier just to
> give them a <figcaption> and refer to "Table 1" and "Table 2" in the
> document.
>
> --Xaxio
> On Jun 20, 2013 12:20 PM, "Steve Faulkner" <faulkner.steve@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>> OK so how do you reference
>>
>> <figure>
>> arial
>> </figure>
>>
>> for example?
>>
>> --
>>
>> Regards
>>
>> SteveF
>> HTML 5.1 <http://www.w3.org/html/wg/drafts/html/master/>
>>
>>
>> On 20 June 2013 20:16, Xaxio Brandish <xaxiobrandish@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>> The figures could be in a document talking about fonts, yet easily moved
>>> to the side of the page and still maintain relevance if referenced within
>>> the document.  I think something important about figures is placement
>>> irrelevance as long as they can be referenced, whereas paragraphs don't
>>> have the added semantic of "this will be referenced at some point."
>>>
>>> --Xaxio
>>> On Jun 20, 2013 12:10 PM, "Steve Faulkner" <faulkner.steve@gmail.com>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> >An illustration of a font name, in its respective font?
>>>>
>>>> why is <figure> better in this case than <p> (for example) ?
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>>
>>>> Regards
>>>>
>>>> SteveF
>>>> HTML 5.1 <http://www.w3.org/html/wg/drafts/html/master/>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On 20 June 2013 19:27, Xaxio Brandish <xaxiobrandish@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> An illustration of a font name, in its respective font?
>>>>>
>>>>> --Xaxio
>>>>> On Jun 20, 2013 11:24 AM, "Steve Faulkner" <faulkner.steve@gmail.com>
>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> What are the use cases for a <figure> without a <figcaption> ?
>>>>>> --
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Regards
>>>>>>
>>>>>> SteveF
>>>>>> HTML 5.1 <http://www.w3.org/html/wg/drafts/html/master/>
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>
Received on Thursday, 20 June 2013 21:28:57 UTC

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