W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > whatwg@whatwg.org > December 2008

[whatwg] Spellchecking mark III

From: Calogero Alex Baldacchino <alex.baldacchino@email.it>
Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2008 03:35:40 +0100
Message-ID: <495ADA7C.30501@email.it>
Robert O'Callahan ha scritto:
> 2008/12/31 Giovanni Campagna <scampa.giovanni at gmail.com 
> <mailto:scampa.giovanni at gmail.com>>
>
>     2008/12/30 timeless <timeless at gmail.com <mailto:timeless at gmail.com>>
>
>         On Tue, Dec 30, 2008 at 5:20 PM, Kornel Lesi??ski
>         <kornel at geekhood.net <mailto:kornel at geekhood.net>> wrote:
>         > It's useful for fields that contain non-textual content,
>         e.g. product ID,
>         > license plate "number", CAPTCHA answer, etc.
>         > Browser would mark these as misspelt, which might be
>         confusing or at least
>         > distracting.
>
>         this sounds like something browser vendors need to worry about on
>         their own and is not a reason to let web pages do anything
>         about it.
>
>
>     maybe we could just say that spellchecking is disabled when type
>     is not text (for email, uri and number you have validation) and
>     when a pattern attribute is specified
>
>
> That handles some cases, but not others --- e.g. text boxes that 
> contain program code.
>
> Rob
> -- 
> "He was pierced for our transgressions, he was crushed for our 
> iniquities; the punishment that brought us peace was upon him, and by 
> his wounds we are healed. We all, like sheep, have gone astray, each 
> of us has turned to his own way; and the LORD has laid on him the 
> iniquity of us all." [Isaiah 53:5-6]
Indeed, that's a valid use case. Anyway, I don't think such a spec 
should and _would_ prevent UAs from giving users a chance to bypass the 
'spellcheck=' attribute (e.g., such an attribute may overcome a UA 
default value, as spec'ed out, but the user may be notified of it, and a 
UA context menu option may allow a different setting, just as a resort 
in case of misuses/errors, such in the example of a 'spellcheck=" 
false"' applied to a box containing some code).

The language to check might be choosen from several sources, such as the 
'lang' attribute of the contenteditable element itself, if different 
from the document language. For instance, a blog editor's interface 
document might not be translated in a certain language, whereas allowing 
content creation in that language and giving the author a chance to set 
the proper language for a spell checker by changing (through script) the 
editor box language.

A possible evolution, if required upon time, might involve a further 
attribute referencing an external dictionary file, perhaps in a standard 
format, or in a format a UA can recognize (thus, indicating 
alternatives), and using the 'spellcheck' attribute when no appropriate 
language/dictionary can be specified, or to say that just the specified 
dictionary/dictionaries must be used.

Best Regards,
Alex
 
 
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Received on Tuesday, 30 December 2008 18:35:40 UTC

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