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[whatwg] <blockquote cite> and <q cite>

From: Karl Dubost <karl@w3.org>
Date: Sat, 6 Jan 2007 13:14:26 +0900
Message-ID: <77657ADE-3E82-4284-86B0-CAF1DBE2585B@w3.org>

Le 6 janv. 2007 ? 12:24, Charles McCathieNevile a ?crit :
> It's a typical metadata/semweb scenario. You have some kind of  
> useful data, but
> different people have different kinds and relying on one particular  
> version
> fails as many people as it helps. (I like RDF because it was  
> designed to provide
> useful answers in the face of lots of partial information).

Indeed and agreed.

> Having written a lot of stuff in the traditional academic world  
> that is slowly
> crawling to the Web, I don't see a lot of ISBN references.

Hear hear. Same here, when I was doing astrophysics research.
Though if you do http://www.google.com/search?q=astrophysics%20isbn

R?sultats 1 - 10 sur un total d'environ 933 000 pour astrophysics  
isbn. (0,40 secondes)

Another example
http://www.citeulike.org/user/ihuston/article/869979
With the tool (back end web server in this case) giving the BibTex  
reference. :) in a form.



> Useful in theory, but not a good basis for any serious work directed
> at the people who are actually going to read what you wrote.

Agreed. It depends on the context of the usage.
What I usually do not want on the Web or in a language like HTML, is  
to prevent a minority to use features of the languages, specifically  
when these do not require anykind of actions (implementations) from  
certain classes of products. (example with role and about attributes  
for desktop browsers).



-- 
Karl Dubost - http://www.w3.org/People/karl/
W3C Conformance Manager, QA Activity Lead
   QA Weblog - http://www.w3.org/QA/
      *** Be Strict To Be Cool ***
Received on Friday, 5 January 2007 20:14:26 UTC

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