W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > whatwg@whatwg.org > April 2005

[whatwg] Some likeness of DOM Session scope

From: Brad Neuberg <bradneuberg@yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Apr 2005 20:47:09 -0700 (PDT)
Message-ID: <20050422034709.21654.qmail@web60709.mail.yahoo.com>
Something along these lines that would be useful is
control over what goes into the history (and what
affects the back button) and what _doesn't_.  Alot of
times I shoot off RPC type functions using
XmlHttpRequest that I _dont_ want in the history,
since they wouldnt be appropriate for the back button,
and other times I want the back button to be affected.

Brad

--- Dimitri Glazkov <dimitri.glazkov at gmail.com> wrote:
> IMHO, one of the biggest obstacles for growth in Web
> applications
> development is the fact that the entire application
> lives in the scope
> of one request.
> 
> Once next request is made, the browser essentially
> "forgets"
> everything and the whole new cycle of loading,
> initialization, and
> binding begins.
> 
> Yes, you can simulate the effect of retaining scope
> across several
> requests with XmlHttpRequest and even frames, but
> it's the "simulate"
> part that bothers me. "Simulate" means "hacking",
> and "hacking"
> inevitably means inconsistent and/or incomplete
> implementations.
> 
> It seems that a future Web Application platform
> should have this type
> of functionality readily available. What do you
> think about the idea
> of having some likeness of a scope that's inherently
> wider than
> request?
> 
> Consider this example (improvising here):
> 
> Request 1:
> 
> function SyntaxHighlighter()
> {
> // code goes here to provide on-the-fly
> beautification of code
> }
> document.session.highlighter = new
> SyntaxHighlighter();
> 
> Request 2+:
> 
> if (document.session.highighter)
> {
> var codeSections =
> document.getElementsBySelector("pre > code")
> for(var i = 0; i < codeSections.length; i++)
> {
> SyntaxHighlighter.apply(codeSections[i]);
> }
> }
> 
> Is this a totally asinine idea?
> 
> :DG<
> 
Received on Thursday, 21 April 2005 20:47:09 UTC

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.3.1 : Monday, 13 April 2015 23:08:22 UTC