W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-webplatform@w3.org > January 2013

Re: CSS Properties Milestone: Enumerating CSS Properties

From: Alex Komoroske <komoroske@google.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2013 08:37:19 -0800
Message-ID: <CAPwaZpVyBopF1nteECkLjaZddTtymSgCQ=1ckgzJVgu99M7Tyg@mail.gmail.com>
To: Chris Mills <cmills@opera.com>
Cc: Janet Swisher <jswisher@mozilla.com>, Jonathan Garbee <jonathan@garbee.me>, "public-webplatform@w3.org" <public-webplatform@w3.org>
On Thu, Jan 17, 2013 at 5:54 AM, Chris Mills <cmills@opera.com> wrote:

> I am working carefully through the spreadsheet today; reckon it'll take me
> a few days to do through the whole lot!
>
> I have corrected a few bits for the entries I've done so far, and my only
> major addition to the spread is to add a "Spec URL" column - thought it
> would be useful to sate what specs they all come from.
>

Sounds good

>
> I've added quite a few properties as well - I keep looking up lesser-known
> properties in the specs and finding a load more stuff that I've never heard
> of!


The way the spreadsheet is set up right now is kind of crazy (once we
finalize on the list of properties we'll just make it a straightforward
sheet. Basically the Whole Data sheet is where we enumerate all properties
we discover (there are *many *duplicates as there are many overlapping
sources), as well as information from that source that we discovered them.
Those are then pulled into the first sheet automatically (uniquified), and
then *that *sheet pulls in data from the Manual Data sheet that's specific
to the property, not the source we found information on.

Which is a long way of saying: each time you add a new row to the Manual
Data sheet, you'll also need to add a row to the "Whole Data" sheet (make
sure to auto-complete the formula-based columns down) so that it will show
up on the master summary on the first sheet.

... Or, just send me an e-mail when you add a new row to the manual data
sheet and I'll make sure it shows up on the main summary.

> Generally my way of working for each entry has been:
>
> * look "css [property-name] spec" up in a search engine to check that it
> is specced, record the spec url, verify the standardization status, etc.
>

The search link in each row does a google search for
"site:w3.org[property-name] css property" already.

> * work through the spec, check the data for other properties that are in
> the spec and the spreadsheet, modify as necessary
> * add entries for any properties that are in the spec and not in the
> spreadsheet
> * add a note for proprietary stuff to say where it came from, and add a
> useful URL for more info, if I can find one
>
> One question that came up: what standardization status does a property's
> spec need to be at for it to be counted as a standard, i.e. for putting a
> "Y" in the "Standards" column?
>

That's an old column I meant to remove but haven't (since I have to update
other sheets and formulas when I remove it). It's superseded by the more
in-depth "Standards-Specific column".

>
> I'll keep working away at it - this is rather fun ;-)
>

Awesome, I'll keep working on it, too.

>
> Chris Mills
> Opera Software, dev.opera.com
> W3C Fellow, web education and webplatform.org
> Author of "Practical CSS3: Develop and Design" (http://goo.gl/AKf9M)
>
> On 16 Jan 2013, at 18:57, Alex Komoroske <komoroske@google.com> wrote:
>
> > I'm making a fair bit of progress on filling in which spec each one
> comes from.
> >
> > I also asked Janet if she's be comfortable sharing the most popular CSS
> Property articles on MDN since that can help us prioritize. I'm resharing
> her response here with her permission:
> >
> > Here is the top ones for the last month (from the more popular to the
> > less one):
> > 1. background-image
> > 2. background-size
> > 3. box-shadow
> > 4. font-size
> > 5. background-position
> > 6. transform
> > 7. box-sizing
> > 8. display
> > 9. text-overflow
> > 10. background
> > 11. font-family
> > 12. pointer-events
> > 13. border-radius
> > 14. color
> > 15. position
> > 16. text-rendering
> > 17. background-color
> > 18. line-height
> > 19. filter (but more likely the old -ms-filter rather than the new
> > filter one)
> > 20. text-align
> > 21. cursor
> > 22. list-style-type
> > 23. font-weight
> > 24. overflow
> > 25. -moz/-webkit-appearance
> >
> >
> >
> > On Tue, Jan 15, 2013 at 10:30 AM, Chris Mills <cmills@opera.com> wrote:
> > On 15 Jan 2013, at 18:16, Alex Komoroske <komoroske@google.com> wrote:
> >
> > > Okay, another check point. I've spent the last few hours wrangling
> with spreadsheet formula syntax.
> > >
> > > For various reasons, the first sheet in the spreadsheet is fully
> automatically generated based on formulas. The second sheet ("Manual Data")
> is where we can manually apply extra data to specific css-properties
> (modulo prefix), like if it's a shorthand property or if it's on standards
> track.
> > >
> > > Chris, one area where you could help immediately is for me to fill in
> the Standards-Specific column in the "Manual Data" sheet [1]. Ideally that
> column would list the standardization status of every property, which will
> help for prioritization (and may help inform us when we actually focus on
> editing every article). For example, I imagine the legal values would be
> something like:
> > >        <the monolithic CSS specs before 2.1>
> > >        CSS2.1
> > >        The remaining values are for the status of each individual
> sub-module
> > >        R
> > >        CR
> > >        WD
> > >        ED
> > >        Proprietary (for anything where no standards discussion has
> started)
> > > Does that sound like something you can help with in the next day or so?
> > >
> >
> > Definitely. I will start work on this tomorrow.
> >
> > >
> > >
> > > [1]
> https://docs.google.com/a/chromium.org/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AkRs-89PKiZpdE0xdm9Sb1ZvRW1ZRzMtWEdyU0Z4OEE#gid=13
> > >
> >
> >
>
>
Received on Thursday, 17 January 2013 16:38:06 UTC

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