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Re: Expand of WG’s Target Input Devices - related new chater

From: Arthur Barstow <art.barstow@nokia.com>
Date: Wed, 09 Nov 2011 07:58:22 -0500
Message-ID: <4EBA78EE.2060108@nokia.com>
To: ext 전종홍 <hollobit@etri.re.kr>
CC: public-webevents@w3.org
Hi Jonathan,

I agree with the various responses to Joystick, Gamepad, Trackball, 
Racing wheel and MIDI.

The DAP WG is doing work related to Sensors and Haptics (Vibration):

   http://www.w3.org/2009/dap/#roadmap

I do not favor expanding this WG's scope to include Gesture Recognition.

-Regards, Art Barstow

Trackbot: this e-mail closes Action-86


On 10/31/11 6:53 PM, ext 전종홍 wrote:
> Dear All,
>
> Currently, according to input device technology, many input devices can be used with web browsers and mobile devices. Various input device APIs can provide the new ways for web and game developers, as well as interaction designers, to access and use joysticks and other controllers for games and mobile applications [1].
>
> Regarding the new chartering [2], I think Web Event WG need to consider developing the new APIs for following input devices in future work.
>
> 1) Joystick [related: https://wiki.mozilla.org/JoystickAPI , http://www.w3.org/2011/09/games/#joystick ]
>
> A joystick is an input device consisting of a stick that pivots on a base and reports its angle or direction to the device it is controlling. Joysticks, also known as 'control columns', are the principal control in the cockpit of many civilian and military aircraft, either as a center stick or side-stick. They often have supplementary switches on them to control other aspects of the aircraft's flight.
> Joysticks are often used to control video games, and usually have one or more push-buttons whose state can also be read by the computer. A popular variation of the joystick used on modern video game consoles is the analog stick. Joysticks are also used for controlling machines such as cranes, trucks, underwater unmanned vehicles, wheelchairs, surveillance cameras and zero turning radius lawn mowers. Miniature finger-operated joysticks have been adopted as input devices for smaller electronic equipment such as mobile phones.
>
>
> 2) Gamepad [related : http://dvcs.w3.org/hg/webevents/raw-file/tip/gamepad.html ]
>
> A gamepad (also called joypad or control pad), is a type of game controller held in two hands, where the digits (especially thumbs) are used to provide input. Gamepads generally feature a set of action buttons handled with the right thumb and a direction controller handled with the left. The direction controller has traditionally been a four-way digital cross (also named a joypad, or alternatively a D-pad), but most modern controllers additionally (or as a substitute) feature an analog stick. Gamepads are the primary means of input on all modern video game consoles except for the Wii (though the Wii Remote can function alternately as a gamepad). Gamepads are also available for personal computers.
>
>
> 3) Trackball
>
> A trackball is a pointing device consisting of a ball held by a socket containing sensors to detect a rotation of the ball about two axes-like an upside-down mouse with an exposed protruding ball. The user rolls the ball with the thumb, fingers, or the palm of the hand to move a cursor. Large tracker balls are common on CAD workstations for easy precision. Before the advent of the touchpad, small trackballs were common on portable computers, where there may be no desk space on which to run a mouse.
>
>
> 4) Racing wheel
>
> A racing wheel is the preferred method of control for use in racing video games, racing simulators, and driving simulators. They are usually packaged with a large paddle styled as a steering wheel, along with a set of pedals for gas, brake, and sometimes clutch actuation, as well as various shifter controls. An analog wheel and pedal set such as this allows the user to accurately manipulate steering angle and pedal control that is required to properly manage a simulated car, as opposed to digital control such as a keyboard. The relatively large range of motion further allows the user to more accurately apply the controls. Racing wheels have been developed for use with arcade games, game consoles, personal computers, and also for professional driving simulators for race drivers.
>
>
> 5) Midi input [ref : http://abumarkub.net/abublog/?page_id=399 ]
>
> MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) is an industry-standard protocol that enables electronic musical instruments (synthesizers, drum machines), computers and other electronic equipment (MIDI controllers, sound cards, samplers) to communicate and synchronize with each other. Unlike analog devices, MIDI does not transmit an audio signal: it sends event messages about musical notation, pitch and intensity, control signals for parameters such as volume, vibrato and panning, cues, and clock signals to set the tempo.
> MIDI composition and arrangement takes advantage of MIDI 1.0 and General MIDI (GM) technology to allow musical data files to be shared among many different devices due to some incompatibility with various electronic instruments by using a standard, portable set of commands and parameters.
>
> 6) Motion Sensing Controller
>
> A motion sensing controller is an input device which allows the user to interact with and manipulate items on screen via gesture recognition and pointing through the use of accelerometer and optical sensor technology. Another feature is its expandability through the use of attachments. Typical examples of motion sensing controller is the Wii Remote, is the primary controller for Nintendo's Wii console. A main feature of the Wii Remote is its motion sensing capability.
>
>
> 7) Gesture recognition
>
> Gesture recognition is a topic in computer science and language technology with the goal of interpreting human gestures via mathematical algorithms. Gestures can originate from any bodily motion or state but commonly originate from the face or hand. Current focuses in the field include emotion recognition from the face and hand gesture recognition. Many approaches have been made using cameras and computer vision algorithms to interpret sign language. However, the identification and recognition of posture, gait, proxemics, and human behaviors is also the subject of gesture recognition techniques.
> Gesture recognition can be seen as a way for computers to begin to understand human body language, thus building a richer bridge between machines and humans than primitive text user interfaces or even GUIs (graphical user interfaces), which still limit the majority of input to keyboard and mouse.
>
>
> 8) Haptic event
>
> Haptic technology, or haptics, is a tactile feedback technology that takes advantage of a user's sense of touch by applying forces, vibrations, or motions to the user. This mechanical stimulation may be used to assist in the creation of virtual objects (objects existing only in a computer simulation), the control of such virtual objects, and the enhancement of the remote control for machines and devices (teleoperators). It has been described as "doing for the sense of touch what computer graphics does for vision". Although haptic devices are capable of measuring bulk or reactive forces that are applied by the user, they should not be confused with touch or tactile sensors that measure the pressure or force exerted by the user to the interface.
>
> ------
>
> [1] http://www.w3.org/2011/09/games/
> [2] http://www.w3.org/2010/webevents/charter/2011/Overview.html
>
>
> Best Regards,
>
> --- Jonathan Jeon
Received on Wednesday, 9 November 2011 12:59:26 UTC

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