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Re: Allow ... centralized dialog up front

From: Charles McCathie Nevile <chaals@yandex-team.ru>
Date: Fri, 01 Feb 2013 15:22:56 +0100
To: adriennefelt@gmail.com, Florian Bösch <pyalot@gmail.com>
Cc: "Arthur Barstow" <art.barstow@nokia.com>, "Webapps WG" <public-webapps@w3.org>
Message-ID: <op.wrtzki1fy3oazb@chaals.local>
On Fri, 01 Feb 2013 15:16:04 +0100, Florian Bösch <pyalot@gmail.com> wrote:

> On Fri, Feb 1, 2013 at 3:02 PM, Adrienne Porter Felt  
> <adriennefelt@gmail.com> wrote:
>> My user research on Android found that people have a hard time  
>> connecting upfront permission requests to the application feature that  
>> needs the permission. This >>meant that people have no real basis by  
>> which to allow or deny the request, except for their own supposition.   
>> IMO, this implies that the better plan is to temporally >>tie the  
>> permission request to the feature so that the user can connect the two.
> In some circumstances this works, in others, it does not. Consider that  
> not every capability has a UI-flow, and that some UI flows are fairly  
> obscure. More often than >not a page will initiate a flurry of  
> permission dialogs up front to get it out of the way. Some of the  
> UI-flows to use a capability happen deep inside an application >activity  
> and can be severely distracting, or crippling to the application.
>
> If a developer wants to use the blow-by-blow popup dialogs, he can still  
> do so by simply not calling an API to get done with the business up  
> front. But for those who >know their application will not work without  
> features X, Y, Z, A, B and C there is no point. They already know their  
> app is not going to work. They already know they >would have to pester  
> the user 6 times with successive popups. They already know that they  
> will severely distract the user or cripple themselves by making the user  
> >click trough 6 popups whenver it becomes necessary. They already know  
> that 80% of their users will quit their page after the 3rd popup asking  
> random questions. >Why should there not be a way to prevent all that  
> from happening?
The stock answer (and I think it is too glib, and we should be thinking  
harder about this) is

"because those who just want the user to agree to give away their security  
and privacy will be able to rely on permission fatigue. Which they can  
create, by getting sufficient users to download versions of popular stuff  
that requests unreasonably complicated permissions. So consolidating  
everything will make the system effectively useless".

cheers

Chaals

-- 
Charles McCathie Nevile - Consultant (web standards) CTO Office, Yandex
chaals@yandex-team.ru Find more at http://yandex.com
Received on Friday, 1 February 2013 14:23:30 GMT

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