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Re: Speech API Community Group

From: Charles Pritchard <chuck@jumis.com>
Date: Tue, 03 Apr 2012 13:29:02 -0700
Message-ID: <4F7B5D8E.6090601@jumis.com>
To: Michael Bodell <mbodell@microsoft.com>
CC: Jerry Carter <jerry@jerrycarter.org>, "Raj (Openstream)" <raj@openstream.com>, Milan Young <Milan.Young@nuance.com>, Jim <Jim@haynes-barnett.net>, Glen Shires <gshires@google.com>, "public-xg-htmlspeech@w3.org" <public-xg-htmlspeech@w3.org>, "public-webapps@w3.org" <public-webapps@w3.org>
I'd like to encourage everyone interested in the Speech API to join the 
mailing list:
http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/public-speech-api/

For those interested in more hands-on interaction, there's the CG:
http://www.w3.org/community/speech-api/

For some archived mailing list discussion, browse the old XG list:
http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/public-xg-htmlspeech/

It seems like we can move this chatter over to public-speech-api and off 
of the webapps list.

-Charles


On 4/3/2012 1:08 PM, Michael Bodell wrote:
>
> A little bit of historical context and resource references might be 
> helpful for some on the email thread.
>
> While this is still an early stage for a community group, if one will 
> happen, it actually isn’t early for the community as a group to talk 
> about this.  In many ways we’ve already done the initial incubation 
> and community discussion and investigation for this space in the HTML 
> Speech XG.  This lead to the XG’s use case and requirements document:
>
> http://www.w3.org/2005/Incubator/htmlspeech/live/requirements.html
>
> which were then refined to a prioritized requirement list after 
> soliciting community input:
>
> http://www.w3.org/2005/Incubator/htmlspeech/XGR-htmlspeech-20111206/#prioritized
>
> As I read it, Milan and Jim and Raj’s requirements discussed are part 
> of FPR7 [Web apps should be able to request speech service different 
> from default] and FPR12 [Speech services that can be specified by web 
> apps must include network speech services], both of which were voted 
> to have “Strong Interest” by the community.
>
> Further work from these requirements led to the community coming up 
> with a proposal, which is ready now to be taken to a standards track 
> process, that was published in the XG final report:
>
> http://www.w3.org/2005/Incubator/htmlspeech/XGR-htmlspeech-20111206/
>
> Hopefully we can all properly leverage the work the community has 
> already done.
>
> Michael Bodell
>
> Co-chair HTML Speech XG
>
> *From:*Jerry Carter [mailto:jerry@jerrycarter.org]
> *Sent:* Tuesday, April 03, 2012 12:50 PM
> *To:* Raj (Openstream); Milan Young; Jim
> *Cc:* Glen Shires; public-xg-htmlspeech@w3.org; public-webapps@w3.org
> *Subject:* Re: Speech API Community Group
>
> We can discuss this in terms of generalities without any resolution, 
> so let me offer two more concrete use cases:
>
>     My friend Jóse is working on a personal site to track teams and
>     player statistics at the Brazil 2014 World Cup.  He recognizes
>     that the browser will define a default language through the HTTP
>     Accept-Language header, but knows that speakers may code switch in
>     their requests (e.g. Spanish + English or Portuguese + English or
>     ) or be better served by using native pronunciations (Jesus =
>     /heːzus/ vs. /ˈdʒiːzəs/).  Hence, he requires a resource that can
>     provide support for Spanish, English, and Portuguese and that can
>     also support multiple simultaneous languages.
>
> These are two solid requirements.  A browser encountering the page 
> might (1) be able to satisfy these requirements, (2) require user 
> permission before accessing such a resource, or (3) be unable to meet 
> the request.
>
>     My colleague Jim has another application for which hundreds of
>     hours have been invested to optimize the performance for a specify
>     recognition resource.  Security considerations further restrict
>     the physical location of conforming resources.  His page requires
>     a very specific resource.
>
> These are two solid requirements.  A browser encountering the page 
> might (1) be able to satisfy these requirements, (2) require user 
> permission before accessing such a resource, or (3) be unable to meet 
> the request.
>
> There are indeed commercial requirements around the capabilities of 
> resources.  We are in full agreement.  It is important to be able to 
> list requirements for conforming resources and to ensure that the 
> browser is enforcing those requirements.  That stated, the application 
> author does no care where such a conforming resource resides so long 
> as it is available to the targeted user population.  The user does not 
> care where the resource resides so long as it works well and does not 
> cost too much to use.
>
> The trick within a Speech JavaScript API is to define what 
> characteristics may be specified for resource selection or, 
> alternatively, to determine that such definition is external to the 
> immediate API: for instance,  there might be a separate spec which is 
> referenced by the Speech JavaScript API.  It is too early to tell what 
> direction the group might go.  It is already clear that there are 
> strong opinions as to what criteria may be necessary for resource 
> selection. *Refusing to participate unless one's specific criteria are 
> addressed strikes me as quite inappropriate at this early stage.*
>
> -=- Jerry
>
> On Apr 3, 2012, at 3:15 PM, Raj (Openstream) wrote:
>
>
>
>
> Perhaps true for users of the applicaitons. But, Authors would need 
> Resource-specification(location),
> hence clearly specifying how network/local services can be used ( even 
> if protocols are out of scope)
> , outside of browser-defaults will be of interest to many including 
> Openstream.
>
> Raj
>
>
>
> On Tue, 3 Apr 2012 14:45:45 -0400
> Jerry Carter <jerry@jerrycarter.org <mailto:jerry@jerrycarter.org>> wrote:
>
> On Apr 3, 2012, at 11:48 AM, Young, Milan wrote:
>
>         The proposal mentions that the specification of a network
>         speech protocol is out of scope. This makes sense given that
>         protocols are the domain of the IETF.
>
>         But I’d like to confirm that the use of network speech
>         services are in scope for this CG.  Would you mind amending
>         the proposal to make this explicit?
>
>     I don't see why any such declaration is necessary.  From the
>     perspective of the application author or of the application user,
>     it matters very little where the speech-to-text operation occurs
>     so long as the result is delivered promptly.  There is no reason
>     that local, network-based, or hybrid solutions would be unable to
>     provide adequate performance.  I believe the current language in
>     the proposal is appropriate.
>
>     -=- Jerry
>
>
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Received on Tuesday, 3 April 2012 20:29:26 GMT

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