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Re: [Bug 11398] New: [IndexedDB] Methods that take multiple optional parameters should instead take an options object

From: Jeremy Orlow <jorlow@chromium.org>
Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2011 22:29:58 +0000
Message-ID: <AANLkTik9SZy-5v5yxcBPd_cpu5Bs7vXx=0vy0UueZ-bi@mail.gmail.com>
To: Jonas Sicking <jonas@sicking.cc>
Cc: public-webapps WG <public-webapps@w3.org>
On Wed, Jan 12, 2011 at 10:13 PM, Jonas Sicking <jonas@sicking.cc> wrote:

> On Tue, Jan 11, 2011 at 2:22 AM, Jeremy Orlow <jorlow@chromium.org> wrote:
> > On Mon, Jan 10, 2011 at 9:40 PM, Jonas Sicking <jonas@sicking.cc> wrote:
> >>
> >> On Tue, Dec 14, 2010 at 12:13 PM, Jeremy Orlow <jorlow@chromium.org>
> >> wrote:
> >> >
> >> > On Tue, Dec 14, 2010 at 7:50 PM, Jonas Sicking <jonas@sicking.cc>
> wrote:
> >> >>
> >> >> On Tue, Dec 14, 2010 at 8:47 AM, Jeremy Orlow <jorlow@chromium.org>
> >> >> wrote:
> >> >>>
> >> >>> Btw, I forgot to mention IDBDatabase.transaction which I definitely
> >> >>> think should take an options object as well.
> >> >>
> >> >> Hmm.. I think we should make the first argument required, I actually
> >> >> thought it was until I looked just now. I don't see what the use case
> is for
> >> >> opening all tables.
> >> >
> >> > FWIW I'm finding that the majority of the IndexedDB code I read and
> >> > write does indeed need to lock everything.  I'm also finding that most
> of
> >> > the code I'm writing/reading won't be helped at all by defaulting to
> >> > READ_ONLY...
> >> >
> >> >>
> >> >> In fact, it seems rather harmful that the syntax which will result in
> >> >> more lock contention is simpler than the syntax which is better
> optimized.
> >> >
> >> > But you're right about this.  So, if we're trying to force users to
> >> > write highly parallelizable code, then yes the first arg probably
> should be
> >> > required.  But if we're trying to make IndexedDB easy to use then
> actually
> >> > the mode should probably be changed back to defaulting to READ_WRITE.
> >> > I know I argued for the mode default change earlier, but I'm having
> >> > second thoughts.  We've spent so much effort making the rest of the
> API easy
> >> > to use that having points of abrasion like this seem a bit wrong.
> >> >  Especially if (at least in my experience) the abrasion is only going
> to
> >> > help a limited number of cases--and probably ones where the developers
> will
> >> > pay attention to this without us being heavy-handed.
> >>
> >> I think "ease of use" is different from "few characters typed". For
> >> example it's important that the API discourages bugs, for example by
> >> making the code easy and clear to read. Included in that is IMHO to
> >> make it easy to make the code fast.
> >
> > It won't make the cost fast.  It'll make it'll allow parallel execution.
> >  Which will only matter if a developer is trying to do multiple reads at
> > once and you have significant latency to your backend and/or it's heavily
> > disk bound.  Which will only be true in complex web apps--the kind where
> a
> > developer is going to be more conscious of various performance
> bottlenecks.
> >  In other words, most of the time, defaulting to READ_ONLY will almost
> > certainly have no visible impact in speed.
>
> It also matters for the use cases of having background workers reading
> from the same table,


Workers are a pretty advanced use case.  One where I'd expect the developer
to be mindful of something like this.


> as well as any time the user opens two tabs to
> the same page. The latter is something that I expect every web app
> would care about.
>

A user will generally only be using one page at a time.  The few apps that I
can think of where this in't true would be fairly advanced use cases where
the developer is going to need to consciously optimize their app anyway.

I doubt that you're going to save the world more grief than you're going to
cause them by defaulting to READ_ONLY.

J
Received on Wednesday, 12 January 2011 22:30:50 GMT

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