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Re: Cross patent just issued to James Gosling?

From: Hector Santos <winserver.support@winserver.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2003 11:59:15 -0400
Message-ID: <007501c37c6b$7de83260$d3232243@FAMILY>
To: "Benjamin Franz" <snowhare@nihongo.org>, <public-web-plugins@w3.org>

I had discussed in one my earlier messages, that to me Eolas did not
adequately describe the idea of transferring the components. I unless I
missed it,  it was the key to the technology.

I reiterated this in my last message:

> One of the key parts of the technology is that the client side "the TV"
> learns new functionality.

> To me, that's really the essential "part" of this technology.  Who cares
about
>  anything else.  Its the ability to teach the client more, to learn how to
> handle "new data-driven" algorithms (DDA) in an automated fashion.

> If the client had every feature or capability to handle every new DDA,
then
> it wouldn't be an issue.

Well, this SUN patent has picked up on this Eolas hole and emphasizes on
this essential part.   Just look at the timing of all this.  It seems to me
SUN saw the "loophole" in Eolas's patent and immediately try to fill this
hole.

Its a day late though.  There is clear prior art in this area and you don't
need to go any further than our own Wildcat! Navigator frontend
client/server system.

This patent makes an attempt with this statement to make it as broad as
possible:

        "While the present invention has been described with reference to a
few specific embodiments,
        the description is illustrative of the invention and is not to be
construed as limiting the invention.
        Various modifications may occur to those skilled in the art without
departing from the true spirit
        and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims."

What's funny here is that the "true spirit" of the computing society and
industry have been violated with this annoying attempt to patent a prior art
concept.

Sincerely,

Hector Santos, CTO
Santronics Software, Inc.
http://www.santronics.com
305-431-2846 Cell
305-248-3204 Office


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Benjamin Franz" <snowhare@nihongo.org>
To: <public-web-plugins@w3.org>
Sent: Tuesday, September 16, 2003 10:30 AM
Subject: Cross patent just issued to James Gosling?



http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PALL&p=1&u=/netahtml/srchnum.htm&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=6,618,754.WKU.&OS=PN/6,618,754&RS=PN/6,618,754

United States Patent  6,618,754
Gosling  September 9, 2003

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----
System for transmission of embedded applications over a network

Abstract

A system and method for transmitting embedded applications over a network
is disclosed, wherein a user of a computer-controlled network client, such
as a remote control device used for controlling a network of
computer-controlled home entertainment devices, or a Web browser running
on a Web client, can request and receive compound documents that include
embedded applications and/or data files that can only be processed (i.e.,
imaged or played) by handlers that are not resident on the client. In
addition to embedded documents, the compound documents that are
transmitted over the network can reference flat files (e.g, image, audio,
or text files), and other compound documents. Whenever a client receives a
compound document, the client determines whether it has access to all of
the documents referenced in the compound document and, if not, requests
the documents to which it does not have local access. So that the multiple
documents embedded in a compound document can be simultaneously output by
the client to a multimodal output device, the requestor includes a
multi-tasking real-time kernel. This scheme allows a client user to
download documents from a server that include embedded applications, which
when executed on the client, allow the client to control the servers using
commands downloaded from the servers.

-- 
Jerry

Gauss's law is always true, but it is not always useful.
    -- David J. Griffiths, "Introduction to Electrodynamics"
Received on Tuesday, 16 September 2003 12:59:31 GMT

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