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Re: [beacon] Random comments

From: Arvind Jain <arvind@google.com>
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 2014 22:00:09 -0800
Message-ID: <CAOYaDdOaSAb5DhPv_hKWUpLgvk1+LwgbhHsXs6DhMR0-sTzpRQ@mail.gmail.com>
To: Boris Zbarsky <bzbarsky@mit.edu>
Cc: public-web-perf <public-web-perf@w3.org>
Did we reach consensus on what changes we make to the algorithm re. which
settings object to use? Is it the incumbent settings object?


On Thu, Jan 9, 2014 at 8:03 AM, Boris Zbarsky <bzbarsky@mit.edu> wrote:

> On 1/9/14 6:48 AM, Anne van Kesteren wrote:
>
>> On Thu, Jan 9, 2014 at 7:50 AM, Simon Pieters <simonp@opera.com> wrote:
>>
>>> But I'm not sure which is better. Anne, Hixie?
>>>
>>
>> HTML seems to use a mix of entry settings object and incumbent
>> settings object, depending on whether it is about resolving URLs or
>> origin checks.
>>
>
> HTML actually uses incumbent settings objects in most cases, I believe;
> the entry settings cases are the ones imposed by compat constraints.
>
>
>  I'm not entirely sure when that difference is
>> observable.
>>
>
> Say you have a web page like so:
>
>   <iframe src="foo.html"></iframe>
>   <script>
>     onload = function() {
>       frames[0].f();
>     }
>   </script>
>
> and foo.html has:
>
>   <script>
>     function f() {
>       // do something
>     }
>   </script>
>
> then "do something" has the main web page as the entry settings object but
> foo.html as the incumbent settings object.  So if "f" did a location set,
> for example, the base URI for that string would be the main web page
> (because Location uses the entry settings object for the base URI), which
> is a bizarre non-local effect that I don't think we should be duplicating
> for other APIs...
>
> -Boris
>
>
Received on Tuesday, 11 February 2014 06:00:37 UTC

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