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Re: CSS animation perf statistics

From: Sigbjørn Vik <sigbjorn@opera.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2011 15:12:51 +0200
To: public-web-perf@w3.org, "Andrew Dupont" <w3@andrewdupont.net>
Message-ID: <op.vw4cbpsppi0hod@id-c0735.oslo.osa>
On Tue, 14 Jun 2011 23:05:30 +0200, Andrew Dupont <w3@andrewdupont.net>  
wrote:

> Mine was one of the aforementioned TXJS talks, so Kyle asked me to weigh  
> in.
>
> Let's imagine that there exists a set of animations that are only worth  
> doing if you can be _somewhat_ sure they'll render at a certain frame  
> rate. On mobile devices, most animations fall into this category. If I'm  
> writing a web app that will only be consumed in MobileSafari, I know I  
> can transition/animate "opacity" and "transform" and know they'll  
> animate smoothly.  But if my app will also be consumed by Android  
> devices, I'm stuck; a few such devices support hardware acceleration,  
> but most don't. On devices that lack support, I'd rather skip the  
> animation altogether, because an animation running at 4 fps is worse  
> than no animation at all.

Opera experimented with some related technology some time ago, see  
http://dev.opera.com/articles/view/presto-2-2-and-opera-10-a-first-look/#fps.  
Those demos still work in Opera 11.

That gave the developer currentFPS and targetFPS properties to play with.  
A similar setup could be included in e.g. CSS, imagine the following:

@media (min-fps:30) {
	body { transition-property: opacity; transition-duration: 2s; }
}

Of course, a currentFPS property could additionally be added to the  
RequestAnimationFrame specification.

-- 
Sigbjørn Vik
Quality Assurance
Opera Software
Received on Wednesday, 15 June 2011 13:13:36 GMT

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