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Re: Is there an existing mechanism that can be used for WebIntents?

From: Paul Kinlan <paulkinlan@google.com>
Date: Thu, 19 Jan 2012 09:15:05 -0800
Message-ID: <CADGdg3CbD3DtYR72YTotS3Ag+UNNjgXs4Kh4xtmW-72Jt=3_oQ@mail.gmail.com>
To: Mike Kelly <mikekelly321@gmail.com>
Cc: James Hawkins <jhawkins@chromium.org>, public-web-intents@w3.org
On Thu, Jan 19, 2012 at 8:54 AM, Mike Kelly <mikekelly321@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
> On Thu, Jan 19, 2012 at 4:34 PM, James Hawkins <jhawkins@chromium.org>
> wrote:
>>
>> There are a few drawbacks with using the link element.
>> * link must appear in the head and is a void element.
>>   - This prevents the use case of the service site providing alternative
>> UI if <intent> is not supported: <intent ...>Intents are not supported!
>>  Check out this work-around</intent>
>
>
> Both of these issues are worth exploring with html5 working group, more than
> happy to get involved on this.
>
>>
>> * In the current syntax you provided, how would the UA know this is an
>> intent registration?  Per the spec, |action| is just a string; we use URLs
>> to set precedence as a developer-friendly way of documenting the action.
>
>
> Presumably UAs only react to the @action tokens they understand? Using link
> will provide them with a slightly larger set of elements to go through to
> find these, which should not present an issue - am I missing something here?

An intent action string can be any string - it is simply a token that
the client and service agree to use to discover each other and have an
accepted basic protocol for data exchange - an enterprise application
that never sees the light of day on the open internet could define
"fluffykittens" as an action name (although that would be a terrible
name) and as long as their client and service applications used
fluffykittens they would be able to discover each other.

>
>>
>> * We'd have to change the HTML parsing algorithm.
>>
>
> I'm not au fait with the implementation here, is this a significant
> undertaking?
>
>>
>> Can you share your objections to using the <intent> element?
>
>
> It is, ostensibly, a link.. so why not expose it as one? There is a lot of
> existing web infrastructure that is already geared up to work with links.
> e.g. atom has a link element, we have the Link header in HTTP, and links and
> relations are already familiar to developers.
>
> Linking is a very 'web' thing, so re-using <link> would make web intents
> 'fit in' better with the rest of the web.

It doesn't have to be a link, absence of a link infers the current
page.  Added to this, the remote page has no need to be fetched which
the <link> element is meant to acheive, i.e, this page enhances the
current page - the intent href semantically doesn't mean this.

>
> Cheers,
> Mike
>
>>
>>
>> On Thu, Jan 19, 2012 at 1:56 AM, Mike Kelly <mikekelly321@gmail.com>
>> wrote:
>>>
>>> Hi Paul,
>>>
>>> Ok thanks, that being the case, what is the difference between <link> vs
>>> <intent> and @rel vs @action in the following example:
>>>
>>> <intent action="http://webintents.org/subscribe" type=".."  href=".." />
>>>
>>> <link rel="http://webintents.org/subscribe" type=".." href=".." />
>>>
>>> So, is it possible for web intents to simply re-use the existing,
>>> ubiquitous <link> instead of having to introduce <intent>?
>>>
>>> Cheers,
>>> Mike
>>>
>>> On Sun, Jan 15, 2012 at 6:23 PM, Paul Kinlan <paulkinlan@google.com>
>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Hi,
>>>>
>>>> This was something that I started to document under
>>>> http://webintents.org/subscribe - the intents discovery mechanism in the
>>>> spec doesn't preculde a UA from detecting this and allowing the user to
>>>> invoke an action to subscribe to the feed using their preferred application.
>>>>
>>>> P
>>>>
>>>> On Fri, Jan 13, 2012 at 4:48 AM, Mike Kelly <mikekelly321@gmail.com>
>>>> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> Hi,
>>>>>
>>>>> I was wondering whether an example of 'web intent' behaviour has
>>>>> already existed for some time:
>>>>>
>>>>> The example I am thinking of is driven by atom/rss links in the head
>>>>> of HTML pages, i.e. an html page containing the following link in the
>>>>> head of the document..
>>>>>
>>>>> <link rel="alternate" type="application/rss+xml" href="...." />
>>>>>
>>>>> .... this causes a browser (e.g. Firefox) to present the user with the
>>>>>
>>>>> option to 'Subscribe to This Page' where the user can fulfil their
>>>>> 'subscription intent'.
>>>>>
>>>>> Would this be considered an equivalent of a web intent?
>>>>>
>>>>> Cheers,
>>>>> Mike
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> Paul Kinlan
>>>> Developer Advocate @ Google for Chrome and HTML5
>>>> G+: http://plus.ly/paul.kinlan
>>>> t: +447730517944
>>>> tw: @Paul_Kinlan
>>>> LinkedIn: http://uk.linkedin.com/in/paulkinlan
>>>> Blog: http://paul.kinlan.me
>>>> Skype: paul.kinlan
>>>>
>>>
>>
>



-- 
Paul Kinlan
Developer Advocate @ Google for Chrome and HTML5
G+: http://plus.ly/paul.kinlan
t: +447730517944
tw: @Paul_Kinlan
LinkedIn: http://uk.linkedin.com/in/paulkinlan
Blog: http://paul.kinlan.me
Skype: paul.kinlan
Received on Thursday, 19 January 2012 17:15:33 GMT

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