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Re: [HOME_NETWORK_TF] Home Network Technologies

From: Matt Hammond <matt.hammond@rd.bbc.co.uk>
Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2011 12:02:16 +0100
To: "Clarke Stevens" <C.Stevens@cablelabs.com>, "public-web-and-tv@w3.org" <public-web-and-tv@w3.org>, "Olivier Carmona" <ocarmona@awox.com>, "Russell Berkoff" <r.berkoff@sisa.samsung.com>, "Bob Lund" <B.Lund@cablelabs.com>
Cc: "Giuseppe Pascale" <giuseppep@opera.com>
Message-ID: <op.vty7l2k6mko9fo@r44116>
Hi Bob,


On Mon, 11 Apr 2011 21:25:17 +0100, Bob Lund <B.Lund@cablelabs.com> wrote:

   ...

> Forgive me if I'm restating what is already obvious but the UPnP  
> services allow a UI device to discover media players and servers, each  
> of which are separate devices. A single UI device can control a  
> multiplicity of servers connected to players. Thus, the UI device is in  
> many senses a remote control. This UI device can send user input to a  
> server or player that itself is presenting UI.
>
> So there is support for two paradigms: a remote controlling a UI device  
> that is probably right in front of you and a UI device controlling  
> multiple servers and renders anywhere on the home network.

This discussion of the capabilities of UPnP has hopefully highlighted a  
third paradigm: a remote with its own UI that controls a single other  
device via the home network.

For example: The remote is a tablet or laptop showing a web based  
presentation. The TV or STB is showing a programme. The TV/STB is sourcing  
the programme from live broadcast, or playing it back from an internal  
hard drive (a PVR style device) or streaming it from an internet video on  
demand service. The presentation content tracks the progress of playback  
and changes between sets of slides to suit the particular part of the  
programme. The web based presentation also allows the user to choose a  
particular part of the programme and jump to it (if the programme is not  
coming from a live broadcast of course!)

The experiment we have done at the BBC involving one of our programmes -   
"AutumnWatch" is a concrete example of this. We have extended this  
experiment to the PVR scenario.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/researchanddevelopment/2010/11/the-autumnwatch-tv-companion-e.shtml


regards


Matt
-- 
| Matt Hammond
| Research Engineer, BBC R&D, Centre House, London
| http://www.bbc.co.uk/rd/
Received on Friday, 15 April 2011 11:03:14 UTC

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