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(Techniques XML Submission Form)

From: WCAG 2.0 Techniques Submission Form <nobody@w3.org>
Date: Wed, 14 Jun 2006 18:53:33 +0000 (GMT)
To: public-wcag2-techs@w3.org
Message-Id: <20060614185333.C0BE666363@dolph.w3.org>


Submitter's Name: Christophe Strobbe
Submitter's Email: christophe.strobbe@esat.kuleuven.be

Technique ID: UNKNOWN
Short Name: Using semantic markup whenever color cues are used
Technique Category: General Techniques
Guideline Reference: content-structure-separation-without-color
Success Criterion Reference: UNKNOWN

Applicability:
All technologies that support color and text.

UA Issues:
See HTML technique H49: Using semantic markup to mark emphasized or special text (http://www.w3.org/TR/2006/WD-WCAG20-TECHS-20060427/#H49)

Description:
The objective of this technique is to combine color and semantic markup to convey information. Most users can quickly scan the content to locate information conveyed by using color. For users who cannot see color, semantic markup can provide a different type of cue. User agents can then make this type of structure perceivable to the user, for example using a different visual presentation for different types of structures or by using a different voice or pitch in an auditory presentation.



[copied from H49:]



Most user agents will visually distinguish text that has been identified using semantic markup. Some assistive technologies provide a mechanism for determining the characteristics of content that has been created using proper semantic markup.

Example 1 Head: Color and strong emphasis for required form fields
Example 1 Description:
An HTML form contains several required fields. The labels for the required fields are displayed in red. In addition, the text of each label is marked up with the STRONG element for stronger emphasis. The instructions for completing the form indicate that &amp;quot;all required fields are displayed in red and are emphasized&amp;quot;, followed by an example.

Resource 1 Title: Phrase elements: EM, STRONG, DFN, CODE, SAMP, KBD, VAR, CITE, ABBR, and ACRONYM
Resource 1 URI: http://www.w3.org/TR/1999/REC-html401-19991224/struct/text.html#h-9.2.1

Related Techniques:
G122
H49

Test Procedure:
For any content where color is used to convey information:



 1. Check that the same information is available through semantic markup.

Expected Result:
Check #1 is true.

Additional Notes:
Technique created as action item from Team C (recorded at http://www.w3.org/2006/06/12-wcag-teamc-minutes.html#action01) to address LC 558.



This technique relates to Situation A of How to Meet 1.3.2.

No example 2 header was submitted!
No example 2 description was submitted!
No resource 2 title submitted!
No resource 2 URI submitted!
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------------------------------------------------

<technique id="UNKNOWN">
<short-name>Using semantic markup whenever color cues are used</short-name>
<applies-to>
<guideline idref="content-structure-separation-without-color" />
<success-criterion idref="UNKNOWN" />
</applies-to>

<applicability>
All technologies that support color and text.
</applicability>
<ua_issues>
See HTML technique H49: Using semantic markup to mark emphasized or special text (http://www.w3.org/TR/2006/WD-WCAG20-TECHS-20060427/#H49)
</ua_issues>
<description>
The objective of this technique is to combine color and semantic markup to convey information. Most users can quickly scan the content to locate information conveyed by using color. For users who cannot see color, semantic markup can provide a different type of cue. User agents can then make this type of structure perceivable to the user, for example using a different visual presentation for different types of structures or by using a different voice or pitch in an auditory presentation.



[copied from H49:]



Most user agents will visually distinguish text that has been identified using semantic markup. Some assistive technologies provide a mechanism for determining the characteristics of content that has been created using proper semantic markup.
</description>

<examples>
<ex_head_1>
Color and strong emphasis for required form fields
</ex_head_1>
<ex_desc_1>
An HTML form contains several required fields. The labels for the required fields are displayed in red. In addition, the text of each label is marked up with the STRONG element for stronger emphasis. The instructions for completing the form indicate that &amp;quot;all required fields are displayed in red and are emphasized&amp;quot;, followed by an example.
</ex_desc_1>
<ex_head_2>

</ex_head_2>
<ex_desc_2>

</ex_desc_2>
</examples>

<resources>
<resources_title1>
Phrase elements: EM, STRONG, DFN, CODE, SAMP, KBD, VAR, CITE, ABBR, and ACRONYM
</resources_title1>
<resource_uri1>
http://www.w3.org/TR/1999/REC-html401-19991224/struct/text.html#h-9.2.1
</resource_uri1>
<resources_title2>

</resources_title2>
<resource_uri2>

</resource_uri2>
</resources>

<related_techniques>
<related_technique>
G122
</related_technique>
<related_technique>
H49
</related_technique>
</related_techniques>

<tests>
<procedure>
For any content where color is used to convey information:



 1. Check that the same information is available through semantic markup.
</procedure>
<expected_result>
Check #1 is true.
</expected_result>
<test_file_1>

</test_file_1>
<pass_fail_1>

</pass_fail_1>
<test_file_2>

</test_file_2>
<pass_fail_2>

</pass_fail_2>
</tests>

</technique>

Additional Notes:

Technique created as action item from Team C (recorded at http://www.w3.org/2006/06/12-wcag-teamc-minutes.html#action01) to address LC 558.



This technique relates to Situation A of How to Meet 1.3.2.
Received on Wednesday, 14 June 2006 18:53:39 GMT

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