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(wrong string) €?

From: <martin.hepp@ebusiness-unibw.org>
Date: Tue, 3 Jun 2014 19:20:25 +0200
Cc: W3C Web Schemas Task Force <public-vocabs@w3.org>
Message-Id: <CFF6524E-41AB-4A32-B14E-4F119F61BD0B@ebusiness-unibw.org>
To: Simon Spero <sesuncedu@gmail.com>
On 03 Jun 2014, at 16:32, Simon Spero <sesuncedu@gmail.com> wrote:

> Ah - that distinguishes it from an offer, which is not binding until accepted, and can be revoked (with a few restrictions, esp. in civil law jurisdictions).
> 
> I have no idea what the legal effect would be if a merchant created offerings not intended to be offers in order to draw traffic for other purposes.
> 
In Germany, it will likely be considered unfair market practices and could put your competitors in a position to stop you from that.
In practice, Google will notice that people bump back from the page quickly and restart their query, so they can rank down the search result.

> It is not unusual to create an offer to buy, though RFPs or other forms of bid solicitation are more usual, which presumably is what  Demand models.

Yes, exactly - schema:Demand is for RFQ/Tenders, wish-lists, etc.

Martin

> 
> Contract ontology is hard. Let's not go shopping - Barbie 3.0 :)
> On Jun 3, 2014 4:05 AM, "martin.hepp@ebusiness-unibw.org" <martin.hepp@ebusiness-unibw.org> wrote:
> Simon:
> gr:Offering is not limited to binding or commercial offers. The non-binding character has been in the textual definition since 2008:
> 
> "An offering represents the public, not necessarily binding, not necessarily exclusive, announcement by a gr:BusinessEntity to provide (or seek) a certain gr:BusinessFunction for a certain gr:ProductOrService to a specified target audience. An offering is specified by the type of product or service or bundle it refers to, what business function is being offered (sales, rental, ...), and a set of commercial properties."
> 
> Historically, gr:Offering could represent the supply and the demand side; this explains the "or seek" part. We fixed that when integrating GR into schema.org, creating http://schema.org/Demand, which will be gr:Demand in the next GR service update.
> 
> 
> 
> Best wishes / Mit freundlichen Gren
> 
> Martin Hepp
> 
> -------------------------------------------------------
> martin hepp
> e-business & web science research group
> universitaet der bundeswehr muenchen
> 
> e-mail:  martin.hepp@unibw.de
> phone:   +49-(0)89-6004-4217
> fax:     +49-(0)89-6004-4620
> www:     http://www.unibw.de/ebusiness/ (group)
>          http://www.heppnetz.de/ (personal)
> skype:   mfhepp
> twitter: mfhepp
> 
> Check out GoodRelations for E-Commerce on the Web of Linked Data!
> =================================================================
> * Project Main Page: http://purl.org/goodrelations/
> 
> 
> 
> 
> On 30 May 2014, at 19:14, Simon Spero <sesuncedu@gmail.com> wrote:
> 
> > On May 30, 2014 6:45 AM, "Dan Brickley" <danbri@google.com> wrote:
> > > Thanks. I had a brief exchange with Martin Hepp yesterday - he has some concerns that we maintain some of the conceptual distinctions underlying Good Relations, will go into more detail next week.
> >
> > >The basic concern was to maintain the notion that "an offer is the promise to transfer some rights on >something", and that if we use the word "offer", that's what it should continue to mean.
> > That's a slightly loose definition of offer (at least, in the GR context);  in the sense used in GR  it appears to be  "an offer is a display of willingness to enter into a contract on specified terms, made in a way that would lead a reasonable person to understand that an acceptance, having been sought, will result in a binding contract" (Black's Law Dictionary).
> >
> > 'vendor' and 'seller' are synonyms.
> >
> > merchant has legal connotations (a merchant may be held to a higher standard of expertise than a nonmerchant) , and does not apply to one providing services.
> >
> > Legally binding promises can be made to transfer temporary possession/right of occupancy, etc (without changing ownership); renting/leasing. However, promises to make gifts are generally not binding, and do not fit neatly into the offer/acceptance paradigm.
> >
> > Vocabulary is cheap.   Lawyers, less so.
> >
> >
> 
Received on Tuesday, 3 June 2014 17:20:56 UTC

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