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Re: Schema.org accessibility proposal Review...

From: Karen Coyle <kcoyle@kcoyle.net>
Date: Fri, 06 Sep 2013 12:39:40 +0100
Message-ID: <5229BEFC.3010001@kcoyle.net>
To: public-vocabs@w3.org


On 9/5/13 6:52 PM, Gerardo Capiel wrote:

> We happen to have a few versions of Alice in Wonderland in Bookshare
> that have been indexed by Google's Custom Search Engine, so let's first
> search for a pure text version of it with no visual components:
> http://www.google.com/cse?cx=001043429226464649088:WMX1711548652&q=more:p:book-accessmode:textual%20-more:p:book-accessmode:visual%20more:p:book-name:alice%20in%20wonderland
> <http://www.google.com/cse?cx=001043429226464649088:WMX1711548652&q=more:p:book-accessmode:textual
> -more:p:book-accessmode:visual more:p:book-name:alice in wonderland>
>
> If you inspect one of those titles using Yandex's webmaster tools or
> Google's rich snippets tool that lets me just plug in a URL parameter,
> we can see the accessibility microdata on that page:
> http://www.google.com/webmasters/tools/richsnippets?q=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.bookshare.org%2Fbrowse%2Fbook%2F18041
> <http://www.google.com/webmasters/tools/richsnippets?q=https://www.bookshare.org/browse/book/18041>
>


Gerardo, I really appreciate seeing this example, and I will say 
something about that in a moment. But to begin, I looked at the various 
codings of media types in library data and see no conflicts with 
accessmode and mediafeature. In fact, I think that these could add some 
very useful information that library data does not contain in a terribly 
usable way.

I noted, however, the "adaptation" data, which looks like:

hasadaptation: 
https://www.bookshare.org/download/book?titleInstanceId=18041&downloadFormat=DAISY_AUDIO
hasadaptation: 
https://www.bookshare.org/download/book?titleInstanceId=18041&downloadFormat=BRF
hasadaptation: 
https://www.bookshare.org/download/book?titleInstanceId=18041&downloadFormat=EPUB3

The "adaptations" here are what I would think of as alternate digital 
formats, and would fit into http://schema.org/encodingFormat. I agree 
with Chaals that directionality between these alternate formats is often 
difficult to determine. I am thinking of this in terms of eBooks, where 
many different formats are generated simultaneously. But what I don't 
know is whether there is significance to the directionality in the 
accessibility environment, so perhaps you can address that.

I also would prefer that the term "adaptation" not be used for changes 
in format/encoding, since in the academic and bibliographic world that 
term refers to changes in the *content* not the physical or digital format.

Thanks,
kc



-- 
Karen Coyle
kcoyle@kcoyle.net http://kcoyle.net
ph: 1-510-540-7596
m: 1-510-435-8234
skype: kcoylenet
Received on Friday, 6 September 2013 11:40:12 UTC

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