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RE: ACTION-306: Declared Data Definition

From: Shane Wiley <wileys@yahoo-inc.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Oct 2012 08:38:31 -0700
To: Rob Sherman <robsherman@fb.com>, Vinay Goel <vigoel@adobe.com>, "public-tracking@w3.org" <public-tracking@w3.org>
Message-ID: <63294A1959410048A33AEE161379C8027480CCDA01@SP2-EX07VS02.ds.corp.yahoo.com>
Rob,

I believe that's fair and relies heavily on prior user consent for that observed activity to be converted to a declared one.

- Shane

From: Rob Sherman [mailto:robsherman@fb.com]
Sent: Wednesday, October 17, 2012 8:35 AM
To: Shane Wiley; Vinay Goel; public-tracking@w3.org
Subject: Re: ACTION-306: Declared Data Definition

Shane,

How would your definition handle activities that a user intentionally shares but does not enter into a form?  As an example, you can (explicitly) authorize Facebook to post a story to your timeline whenever you listen to a song on Spotify.  This is information that a user has specifically instructed us to receive and use - and has instructed Spotify to provide -- but that is not "entered into a form" on each occasion.

Rob

Rob Sherman
Facebook | Manager, Privacy and Public Policy
1155 F Street, NW Suite 475 | Washington, DC 20004
office 202.370.5147 | mobile 202.257.3901

From: Shane Wiley <wileys@yahoo-inc.com<mailto:wileys@yahoo-inc.com>>
Date: Wednesday, October 17, 2012 11:17 AM
To: Vinay Goel <vigoel@adobe.com<mailto:vigoel@adobe.com>>, "public-tracking@w3.org<mailto:public-tracking@w3.org>" <public-tracking@w3.org<mailto:public-tracking@w3.org>>
Subject: RE: ACTION-306: Declared Data Definition
Resent-From: <public-tracking@w3.org<mailto:public-tracking@w3.org>>
Resent-Date: Wednesday, October 17, 2012 11:18 AM

Vinay,

The Search debate is a long and tortured one so I purposely attempted to avoid it.  :)

On the Like or +1 buttons, we've already decided as a group that once the user clicks on the button (meaningful interaction) that it falls under 1st party rules at that point.  That said, I don't see a click on a Like button, an ad, or video player as declared data - the click is simply observed not a declaration of data from the user to the web site/service.

- Shane

From: Vinay Goel [mailto:vigoel@adobe.com]
Sent: Wednesday, October 17, 2012 8:04 AM
To: Shane Wiley; public-tracking@w3.org<mailto:public-tracking@w3.org>
Subject: Re: ACTION-306: Declared Data Definition

Hi Shane,

Would your definition of declared data include either search queries or a user clicking on a 'Like' or '+1'?   I like your examples of information provided on a site registration or contest entry form but think we need to be clearer to exclude search queries or clicks on Like/+1.  I believe the user would consider both of those as observed behavior and not part of its registration with that party.

-Vinay

From: Shane Wiley <wileys@yahoo-inc.com<mailto:wileys@yahoo-inc.com>>
Date: Tuesday, October 16, 2012 10:53 PM
To: "public-tracking@w3.org<mailto:public-tracking@w3.org>" <public-tracking@w3.org<mailto:public-tracking@w3.org>>
Subject: ACTION-306: Declared Data Definition
Resent-From: <public-tracking@w3.org<mailto:public-tracking@w3.org>>
Resent-Date: Tuesday, October 16, 2012 10:54 PM

Proposed text per our discussions in Amsterdam.

Tracking Compliance and Scope
Related to ISSUE-54: Can first parties use declared data while in a 3rd party context?

Declared Data:  Information directly and expressly supplied by a user to a party through meaningful interaction with that party.

Examples would include most situations where a user is asked to enter data into a form for submission, such as a site registration process or contest entry form.
Received on Wednesday, 17 October 2012 15:39:30 UTC

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