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RE: Issue 115, exemptions, best practices

From: Kevin Smith <kevsmith@adobe.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Feb 2012 11:12:15 -0800
To: Jeffrey Chester <jeff@democraticmedia.org>, "public-tracking@w3.org (public-tracking@w3.org)" <public-tracking@w3.org>
Message-ID: <6E120BECD1FFF142BC26B61F4D994CF3064CAB4B79@nambx07.corp.adobe.com>
Jeffrey, I would really be interested to hear what experience you would want a user with DNT:1 enabled to have when visiting a publisher's website.  I understand your concern about pressuring visitors into exceptions.  However, a site has to have the right to not give content away for free.  Even a 404 error page stating that a site is not available to visitors with DNT enabled would fall under the blanket condition "A site should not use a special landing page that has been designed principally to convert a user to agree to permit an exemption".

How do you believe a site should express its desire to monetize a visitor or its desire to not show content to a visitor it cannot monetize adequately?  You have provided a list of best practices for what NOT to do.  Can you provide a list of best practices for what TO do?  Perhaps the two lists together might make a better starting point for discussion.

From: Jeffrey Chester [mailto:jeff@democraticmedia.org]
Sent: Wednesday, February 08, 2012 12:06 PM
To: public-tracking@w3.org (public-tracking@w3.org)
Subject: Issue 115, exemptions, best practices

 https://www.w3.org/2011/tracking-protection/track/issues/115

[I await input from Ninja, Alan and Jim]



Best Practices for sites to manage exemptions should include:

A site must provide accurate information to users on the actual data collection and use practices of the site.  This should include all information used for tracking, targeting, sales of profiles.
A site should not suggest that the ability to access information is dependent on blanket acceptance of a site's data practices.
A site should not use "immersive" multimedia applications designed to foster opt-in as a way to encourage a user agreeing to an exemption.
A site should not use a special landing page that has been designed principally to convert a user to agree to permit an exemption.
A site should not use social media marketing to urge a user to ask their "friends" to approve exemptions.
A site should not offer rewards and incentives for a user to approve of an exemption.
Received on Thursday, 9 February 2012 19:12:45 UTC

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