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WWW/2011/tracking-protection/drafts tracking-compliance.html,1.64,1.65

From: Nick Doty via cvs-syncmail <cvsmail@w3.org>
Date: Fri, 17 Aug 2012 23:10:08 +0000
To: public-tracking-commit@w3.org
Message-Id: <E1T2Vg8-0002k5-4F@lionel-hutz.w3.org>
Update of /w3ccvs/WWW/2011/tracking-protection/drafts
In directory hutz:/tmp/cvs-serv10479

Modified Files:
	tracking-compliance.html 
Log Message:
merging Roy's and Justin's versions; includes Roy's typo fixes and Justin's updates to the definitions and details on options

Index: tracking-compliance.html
===================================================================
RCS file: /w3ccvs/WWW/2011/tracking-protection/drafts/tracking-compliance.html,v
retrieving revision 1.64
retrieving revision 1.65
diff -u -d -r1.64 -r1.65
--- tracking-compliance.html	17 Aug 2012 21:59:29 -0000	1.64
+++ tracking-compliance.html	17 Aug 2012 23:10:05 -0000	1.65
@@ -1,4 +1,3 @@
-<<<<<<< tracking-compliance.html
 <!DOCTYPE html>
 <html>
 <head>
@@ -135,7 +134,7 @@
 	<p>People have the right to know how data about them will be collected and how it will be used. Empowered with that knowledge, individuals can decide whether to allow their online activities to be tracked and data about them to be collected. Many Internet companies use data gathered about people's online activities to personalize content and target advertising based on their perceived interests. While some people appreciate this personalization of content and ads in certain contexts, others are troubled by what they perceive as an invasion of their privacy. For them, the benefit of personalization is not worth their concerns about allowing entities with whom they have no direct relationship to amass detailed profiles about their activities.</p>
 	<p>Therefore, users need a mechanism to express their own preference regarding tracking that is both simple to configure and efficient when implemented. In turn, Web sites that are unwilling or unable to offer content without such targeted advertising or data collection need a mechanism to indicate those requirements to the user and allow them (or their user agent) to make an individual choice regarding user-granted exceptions.</p>
 	<p>This specification defines the terminology of tracking preferences, the scope of its applicability, and the requirements on compliant first-party and third-party participants when an indication of tracking preference is received. This specification defines the meaning of a Do Not Track preference and sets out practices for websites and other online companies to comply with this preference.</p>
-	<p>A companion document, [[!!TRACKING-DNT]], defines the HTTP request header field DNT for expressing a tracking preference on the Web, a well-known location (URI) for providing a machine-readable tracking status resource that describes a service's DNT compliance, the HTTP response header field Tk for resources to communicate their compliance or non-compliance with the user's expressed preference, and JavaScript APIs for determining DNT status and requesting a site-specific, user-granted exception.</p>
+	<p>A companion document, [[!TRACKING-DNT]], defines the HTTP request header field DNT for expressing a tracking preference on the Web, a well-known location (URI) for providing a machine-readable tracking status resource that describes a service's DNT compliance, the HTTP response header field Tk for resources to communicate their compliance or non-compliance with the user's expressed preference, and JavaScript APIs for determining DNT status and requesting a site-specific, user-granted exception.</p>
 </section>
[...1025 lines suppressed...]
-<p>This specification consists of input from many discussions within and around the W3C Tracking Protection Working Group, along with written contributions from Haakon Flage Bratsberg (Opera Software), Amy Colando (Microsoft Corporation), Roy T. Fielding (Adobe), Tom Lowenthal (Mozilla), Ted Leung (The Walt Disney Company), Jonathan Mayer (Stanford University), Ninja Marnau (Invited Expert), Matthias Schunter (IBM), John M. Simpson (Invited Expert), Kevin G. Smith (Adobe), Rob van Eijk (Invited Expert), Rigo Wenning (W3C), and Shane Wiley (Yahoo!).</p>
-<p>The DNT header field is based on the original Do Not Track submission by Jonathan Mayer (Stanford), Arvind Narayanan (Stanford), and Sid Stamm (Mozilla). The DOM API for NavigatorDoNotTrack is based on the Web Tracking Protection submission by Andy Zeigler, Adrian Bateman, and Eliot Graff (Microsoft). Many thanks to Robin Berjon for ReSpec.js.</p>
-</section>
-
-<section id="references">
-<h2>References</h2><h3>B.1 Normative references</h3>
-<p>[HTTP11</p>
-<p>R. Fielding; et al. <a href="http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2616.txt">Hypertext Transfer Protocol - HTTP/1.1.</a> June 1999. Internet RFC 2616. URL: <a href="http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2616.txt">http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2616.txt</a></p>
-<p>[!!TRACKING-DNT</p>
-<p>Roy T. Fielding; David Singer. <a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/tracking-dnt/">Tracking Preference Expression (DNT).</a> 13 March 2012. W3C Working Draft. (Work in progress.) URL: <a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2011/WD-tracking-dnt-20120313/">http://www.w3.org/TR/2011/WD-tracking-dnt-20120313/</a></p>
-<h3>B.2 Informative references</h3>
-<p>[KnowPrivacy</p>
-<p>Joshua Gomez; Travis Pinnick; Ashkan Soltani. <a href="http://www.knowprivacy.org/report/KnowPrivacy_Final_Report.pdf">KnowPrivacy.</a> 1 June 2009. URL: <a href="http://www.knowprivacy.org/report/KnowPrivacy_Final_Report.pdf">http://www.knowprivacy.org/report/KnowPrivacy_Final_Report.pdf</a></p>
-</section>
-<div id="toggle-widget">
-  <a href="#" id="toggle-button">Hide non-normative sections</a>
-</div>
-</body>
-</html>
->>>>>>> 1.63
Received on Friday, 17 August 2012 23:10:09 GMT

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